Diabetes News – November 2019

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Consider that while almost 30 million people in the U.S. have some form of diabetes, one in four don’t even realize they’re walking around with the disease. National Diabetes Month is an annual event each November to boost awareness about the risk factors, symptoms, and types of diabetes. If you’ve been recently diagnosed with either Type 1 or Type 2, or if you are considered pre-diabetic, hear the stories, check out the latest research, and connect with others who can help you on your journey to live a healthier life.

There are two main conditions

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body can’t produce insulin, a hormone in the pancreas that breaks down carbohydrates into blood sugar or glucose, for energy. Insulin therapy helps the pancreas to function normally. Many children suffer from Type 1 diabetes although it can affect people of any age or background. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease where the body is unable to process our internal insulin well enough to keep blood sugar at normal levels.

Know your risk factors

You may be predisposed to Type 2 diabetes if you are overweight, older than 45, your parent had Type 2 diabetes, you barely exercise each week, and you have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Losing weight is a key preventive measure. With a 10-14 pound weight loss, you can improve your chances of avoiding or even beating diabetes. Try to exercise about 30 minutes a day, five times per week.

How to Observe National Diabetes Month

1.    Commit to a healthier lifestyle

Discover ways that you can live a little healthier by reviewing your habits. Are you getting enough sleep? Fatigue can cause a resistance to the insulin your body needs — and daytime tiredness can stop you from getting some life-saving exercise. Drink more water because dehydration keeps your body from functioning well. Be adventurous and add some new veggies and fruits to your diet to help keep those hunger pangs at bay.

2.    Assemble a “sick day” kit

It pays to be ready for those days when your diabetes or some other illness gets you down. With a “sick day” kit, you’ll be prepared in case you need to stay home and recuperate or head out to see your doctor. Some of the items in your kit may include blood glucose monitoring supplies, ketone test strips, glucose tablets or gel, a thermometer, hand sanitizer, an alarm clock or timer to stay on top of your glucose levels, and soft tissues. It’s your list so tailor it for your needs.

3.    Create a small cookbook

There are restrictions on what people with diabetes can eat. But that shouldn’t stop you from enjoying tasty treats. Scour special cookbooks and websites designed for diabetics and experiment with recipes. Choose from delicious ice cream cakes using light sugar, reduced-fat whipped toppings, sugar-free hot fudge sauce, or low-cal casserole because you don’t have to suffer with less flavor because of diabetes.

And speaking of cookbook and recipes…

Thanksgiving is a wonderful time of year for family to spend time together—and enjoy an indulgent meal. But for the 30 million Americans who live with type 2 diabetes, a spread of carb-heavy foods and sugary desserts can make managing blood sugar spikes difficult.

Of course, it can be even harder than usual to stick to a diabetes-friendly diet when all of your friends and family are chowing down on your mom’s homemade stuffing and pumpkin pie. However, it’s important to remember that you can enjoy the feast, too—it’s all about moderation.

So how do you let yourself indulge without going overboard? Keep these tips in mind before your feast:

Pile on the protein. Foods that are low-carb and high-protein will be the best options. Your body digests protein more slowly, thus creating less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Go for the turkey first!

Choose the right carbs. Carbs that come from high-quality, plant-based sources such as quinoa, sweet potatoes, winter squash, and berries come with fiber, which helps food digest slower. Limit the added sugar.

Keep your portion sizes in check. After all, there will be leftovers. Quantity and portion sizing will be the most important factor in keeping your blood-sugar levels balanced through the holidays.

Make smart swaps. You can make tiny changes to almost any recipe to make it more diabetes-friendly. For example, when making baked goods or desserts, substitute a healthier type of flour. Coconut and almond flours can be especially helpful in lowering the carbs, but whole wheat, oat, and chickpea flours will also add higher-quality carbs compared to white flour, creating a more diabetes-friendly dish.

Get moving. If you do overeat (hey, we are all human!), try going for a walk after the big meal, which will help prevent a blood sugar spike.

So there you have it—there’s no need to fret over the holiday spread. Try adding this recipe to your holiday dinner. The entire family will have no problem digging into this mouthwatering dish.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Salad with Maple Butternut Squash, Pumpkin Seeds, and Cranberries

Prep Time 20 minutes

Cook Time 20 minutes

Total Time 40 minutes

Servings 8 servings

Calories 232 kcal

Ingredients

Roasted Brussels Sprouts:

  • 3cups Brussels sprouts , ends trimmed, yellow leaves removed
  • 3tablespoons olive oil
  • Saltto taste

Roasted Butternut Squash:

  • 1 1/2lb butternut squash peeled, seeded, and cubed into 1-inch cubes (Yields about 4 cups of uncooked cubed butternut squash)
  • 2tablespoons olive oil
  • 3tablespoons maple syrup
  • ½teaspoon ground cinnamon

Other Ingredients:

  • 1/2cups pumpkin seeds
  • 1cup dried cranberries
  • 3/4 cups of nuts (whole or chopped, walnut or pecan work well)

Instructions

Roasted Brussels sprouts:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F. Lightly grease the foil-lined baking sheet with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.
  2. Make sure Brussels sprouts have trimmed ends and yellow leaves are removed. Then, slice all Brussels sprouts in half. In a medium bowl, combine halved Brussels sprouts, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt (to taste), and toss to combine. Place onto a foil-lined baking sheet, cut side down, and roast in the oven at 400 F for about 20-25 minutes. During the last 5-10 minutes of roasting, turn them over for even browning, the cut sides should be nicely and partially charred but not blackened (see my photos).

Roasted butternut squash:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F. Lightly grease the foil-lined baking sheet with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine cubed butternut squash (peeled and seeded),1 tablespoon of olive oil, maple syrup, and cinnamon, and toss to mix.
  3. Place butternut squash in a single layer on the baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes, turning once half-way through baking, until softened.
  4. Note: You can roast both Brussels sprouts and butternut squash on 2 separate baking sheets at the same time, on the same rack in the oven – that’s what I did.

Assembly:

  1. In a large bowl, combine roasted Brussels sprouts, roasted butternut squash, pumpkin seeds, cranberries, and nuts. Mix to combine.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Clyde Health & Wellness Screening

Clyde Urgent Care
1470 W. McPherson Hwy
Clyde, OH

Saturday, November 9
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Vermilion Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Rogers
1605 State Route 60
Vermilion, OH

Thursday, December 12
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

*sources: diabetes.org, nationaltoday.com, cookinglight.com, diabeticgourmet.com

Diabetes News – October 2019

October is National Blindness Awareness Month

In August we acknowledged National Eye Exam Month and to re-cap: Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable new onset blindness in working-age adults. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease for people with diabetes. It occurs when the small blood vessels in the eye are damaged by high levels of glucose in the blood. Anyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can have diabetic eye disease and not know it, as it is painless and often has no symptoms until very advanced stages. The earlier it is diagnosed the more effective the treatment. With appropriate care you can reduce the risk of blindness and increase your chances of preserving sight.

Clinical guidelines recommend you take a three-pronged approach to preserving your vision:

  1. Maintain excellent A1C and blood glucose levels.
  2. Keep your blood pressure and other health factors, such as your cholesterol, in check.
  3. Make sure you get your eyes checked YEARLY through a dilated eye exam (an exam in which the doctor places drops in your eyes) or specially validated photographs of your retinas (the inside of the eyes).

October is also Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast cancer doesn’t discriminate. ​Although breast cancer is more prevalent among American white women, African-American women tend to die from the disease more often. Overall, only one percent of American males are diagnosed with breast cancer, but African-American men just like women in their community, are more prone to die from the disease. An estimated 2,670 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the United States and approximately 500 will die. 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, except for skin cancers.

A risk factor is anything that increases your chances of getting a disease, such as breast cancer. But having a risk factor, or even many, does not mean that you are sure to get the disease. Certain breast cancer risk factors are related to personal behaviors, such as diet and exercise. Other lifestyle-related risk factors include decisions about having children and taking medicines that contain hormones.

Lifestyle-related Breast Cancer Risk Factors include:

  • Drinking Alcohol – The American Cancer Society recommends that women who drink have no more than 1 drink a day.
  • Being Overweight or Obese – being overweight after menopause is more strongly linked with an increased risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, whereas some research suggests that being overweight before menopause might increase your risk of the less common triple-negative breast cancer.
  • Not being physically active – The American Cancer Society recommends that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week (or a combination of these), preferably spread throughout the week.

For women:

  • Not having children – Women who have not had children or who had their first child after age 30 have a slightly higher breast cancer risk overall.
  • Not breastfeeding -breastfeeding may slightly lower breast cancer risk, especially if it’s continued for a year or more
  • Birth Control – Some birth control methods use hormones, which might increase breast cancer risk.
  • Hormone therapy after menopause – Use of combined hormone therapy after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer
  • Breast Implants -implants have not been linked with an increased risk of the most common types of breast cancer. However, they have been linked to a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma called breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL)

Many of these risk factors overlap with diabetic risk factors/preventions. Higher insulin levels have been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer. Managing your diabetes by keeping a healthy insulin level and lifestyle, you may also lessen your risk factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer is sometimes found after symptoms appear, but many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. This is why regular breast cancer screening is so important. Talk to you PCP about risk factors, screenings and other things you can do for disease prevention and/or treatment.

October is ALSO Pumpkin-Everything Mont!  So give this recipe a try. It is packed full of taste and is healthy enough for breakfast (and yummy enough for a dessert).

Pumpkin Muffins

  • Prep Time:10 mins
  • Cook Time:23 mins
  • Total Time:33 minutes
  • Recipe yields 12 muffins.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 2 eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 cup pumpkin purée
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin spice blend (or 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, ½ teaspoon ground ginger, ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg, and ¼ teaspoon ground allspice or cloves)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup old-fashioned oats, plus more for sprinkling on top
  • Optional: ½ C cranberries, chopped nuts, or chocolate chips

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit (165 degrees Celsius). Grease all 12 cups of your muffin tin with butter or non-stick cooking spray.
  2. In a large bowl, beat the oil and honey together with a whisk. Add the eggs, and beat well. Add the pumpkin purée, milk, pumpkin spice blend, baking soda, vanilla extract and salt.
  3. Add the flour and oats to the bowl and mix with a large spoon, just until combined (a few lumps are ok). If you’d like to add any additional mix-ins***, like nuts, chocolate or dried fruit, fold them in now.
  4. Divide the batter evenly between the muffin cups. Sprinkle the tops of the muffins with about a tablespoon of oats, followed by a light sprinkle of raw sugar and/or pumpkin spice blend if you’d like. Bake muffins for 22 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into a muffin comes out clean.
  5. Place the muffin tin on a cooling rack to cool. These muffins are delicate until they cool down. You might need to run a butter knife along the outer edge of the muffins to loosen them from the pan.
  6. These muffins will keep at room temperature for up to 2 days, or in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. They keep well in the freezer in a freezer-safe bag for up to 3 months (just defrost individual muffins as needed).

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Kuns office
101 South Washington
Castalia, OH

Saturday, October 19
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Clyde Health & Wellness Screening

Clyde Urgent Care
1470 W. McPherson Hwy
Clyde, Oh

Saturday, November 9
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

Just in! One more class has been added for this year.

Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7 and 14

(Thursday afternoons) 2:30pm to 4:30pm

Perkins Township Hall
2610 Columbus Ave.
Sandusky, OH 44870

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger

419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

Diabetes News – Sept 2019

September is National Cholesterol Education Month

What is cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance found in your body and many foods. Your body needs cholesterol to function normally and makes all that you need. Too much cholesterol can build up in your arteries. After a while, these deposits narrow your arteries, putting you at risk for heart disease and stroke.

How does diabetes affect cholesterol?

Diabetes tends to lower “good” cholesterol levels and raise triglyceride and “bad” cholesterol levels, which increases the risk for heart disease and stroke. This common condition is called diabetic dyslipidemia. Diabetic dyslipidemia means your lipid profile is going in the wrong direction. It’s a deadly combination that puts patients at risk for premature coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. Studies show a link between insulin resistance, which is a precursor to type 2 diabetes, and diabetic dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and blood vessel disease. These conditions can develop even before diabetes is diagnosed.

If you have high cholesterol, what can you do to lower it?

You can lower your cholesterol levels through lifestyle changes:

  • Low-fat and high-fiber food (Eat more fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, and whole grains).
  • For adults, getting at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate or 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous physical activity a week. For those aged 6-17, getting 1 hour or more of physical activity each day.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don’t smoke or quit if you smoke.

In addition, your doctor may prescribe medications to treat your high cholesterol.

To be smarter about what you eat, you’ll may need to pay more attention to food labels. As a starting point:

  • Know your fats. Knowing which fats raise LDL (bad) cholesterol and which ones don’t is key to lowering your risk of heart disease.
  • Cooking for lower cholesterolA heart-healthy eating plan can help you manage your blood cholesterol level.

Here is a recipe that is heart and diabetic friendly, as well as simple and delicious!

Italian chicken and vegetable packet  (Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast, about 3 ounces
  • 2 cup diced zucchini
  • 2 cup scrubbed and diced potato
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 1 cup sliced baby carrots
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning or oregano

Directions

Heat oven to 350 F.

Cut off a 12-inch sheet of heavy-duty aluminum foil or parchment paper. Fold the foil or parchment paper in half, unfold and spray with cooking spray.

For each packets: Center the chicken breast on the sheet. Top with 1/4: zucchini, potato, onion, carrots and mushrooms. Sprinkle garlic powder and Italian seasoning on the chicken and vegetables.

Bring the foil together and make small, overlapping folds down the length of the packet to seal. Twist the two ends several times to make a tight seal so the liquid won’t escape during cooking.

Place the packet on a cookie sheet and bake for 45 minutes, until chicken and vegetables are tender.

*This recipe may also be prepared on the grill. Use heavy-duty aluminum foil and place it off to the side of the flame. Turn midway through the cooking time.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening
Firelands Main Campus
1111 Hayes Ave. Sandusky, OH

Saturday, September 14
7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Kuns office
101 South Washington
Castalia, OH

Saturday, October 19
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

Just in! One more class has been added for this year.

Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7 and 14

(Thursday afternoons) from 2:30pm to 4:30pm
Perkins Township Hall
2610 Columbus Ave.
Sandusky, OH 44870

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger

419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

For additional date and locations contact Serving Our Seniors at 419-624-1856.

Diabetes News – August 2019

August is National Eye Exam Month

Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable new onset blindness in working-age adults. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease for people with diabetes. It occurs when the small blood vessels in the eye are damaged by high levels of glucose in the blood. Anyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can have diabetic eye disease and not know it, as it is painless and often has no symptoms until very advanced stages. The earlier it is diagnosed the more effective the treatment. With appropriate care you can reduce the risk of blindness and increase your chances of preserving sight.

Clinical guidelines recommend you take a three-pronged approach to preserving your vision:

  1. Maintain excellent A1C and blood glucose levels.
  2. Keep your blood pressure and other health factors, such as your cholesterol, in check.
  3. Make sure you get your eyes checked YEARLY through a dilated eye exam (an exam in which the doctor places drops in your eyes) or specially validated photographs of your retinas (the inside of the eyes).

Although diabetes is the leading cause of adult-onset blindness, the good news is that vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy can be prevented. Take charge of your eye health and make sure that an annual dilated eye exam is part of your comprehensive treatment plan.

August is also great grilling weather! This recipe is definitely worth trying. Use the vegetables recommended in the recipe or switch it up with something fresh from the garden or the farmer’s market.

Summer Steak Kabobs

Ingredients

  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1-1/2 pounds beef top sirloin steak, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 pound whole fresh mushrooms
  • 2 medium onions, cut into wedges
  • 1 medium sweet red pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium green pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium yellow summer squash, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • Hot cooked rice – your favorite kind will work just fine

Directions

  • In a large bowl, combine first six ingredients. Add beef; turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight.
  • On 12 metal or soaked wooden skewers, alternately thread beef and vegetables; discard marinade. Grill kabobs, covered, over medium heat until beef reaches desired doneness, 10-12 minutes, turning occasionally. Serve with rice. ENJOY!

COMMUNITY OFFERINGS:

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Braniecki and Dr. Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH
Saturday, August 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening

Firelands Main Campus
1111 Hayes Ave. Sandusky, OH
Saturday, September 14
7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

No classes available at this time. Classes will start again next year. Dates will be posted here later this fall.

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger

419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

For additional date and locations contact Serving Our Seniors at 419-624-1856.

Diabetes News – July 2019

July is National Picnic Month

Picnics hearken back to mid-18th-century al fresco French dining. July is an excellent time for National Picnic Month. The fresh air stirs the appetite, and garden vegetables and fruits make outdoor eating easier. Remember to keep the meals simple and focus on the company. Sandwiches, finger foods, and beverages may seem plain, but it’s more about spending time with each other and being in nature.

Healthy food options and activity are important parts of managing your diabetes. Making your picnic “diabetic friendly” is not as hard as you might think. Use these tips to make it easy.
• Choose wholegrain varieties of starchy carbs such as couscous or pasta in salads, potato salads with the skins left on, and wholegrain bread for sandwiches.
• For cold meats, try leaner options such as chicken or turkey breast rather than salami or ham.
• Add crunch to sandwiches with extra veggies such as pepper, carrot, cucumber and lettuce.
• Use beans in a salad to up the protein content and to make it more filling.
• Swap sugary and fatty treats such as cake and cookies for healthier alternatives – mixed nuts, fruit, unsalted rice cakes and low-fat fruit yogurts make great replacements.
• Sip on water, no-added sugar fruit drinks or diet drinks to stay hydrated.
• Make your own dips, dressings and marinades from scratch at home to avoid the high fat, sugar and salt content from store-bought varieties.
• From playing games to going for a walk, combine your picnic with some physical activity to maximize the health benefits.

Try adding this tasty recipe to your picnic basket.

Pulled Chicken & Pickled Veggie Wraps

Ingredients

2 cups julienned or coarsely shredded carrots
1 cup julienned radishes
1 cup thinly sliced red onion
½ cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup light mayonnaise
1 teaspoon siracha, plus more for serving
8 7- to 8-inch low-carb whole-wheat tortillas, such as La Tortilla Factory
8 Bibb and/or red-leaf lettuce leaves
2⅔ cups shredded cooked chicken breast

Directions

• Combine carrots, radishes, onion, vinegar, sugar and salt in a sealable plastic bag. Turn to coat. Set the bag in a shallow dish and marinate in the refrigerator for 1 hour.
• Stir mayonnaise and siracha in a small bowl. Drain the pickled vegetables (discard marinade).
• Spread 1 Tbsp. of the mayonnaise mixture on each tortilla. Top with lettuce, chicken and pickled vegetables and roll up. Wrap and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Serve drizzled with more siracha, if desired.

COMMUNITY OFFERINGS:

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center
You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Vermilion Health & Wellness Screening
Dr. Rogers Office
1605 State Route 60
Vermilion, OH

Thursday, July 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Port Clinton Health &Wellness Screening
Drs. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, August 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

• Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
• Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
• PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
• Vitamin D – $35;
• TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

WHEN:
July 10, 2019 – August 14, 2019
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

WHERE:
Kelleys Island School
528 Division Street, Kelleys Island

COST:
Free

CONTACT:
Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required, 419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

For additional date and locations contact Serving Our Seniors at 419-624-1856.

Diabetes News – June 2019

June is National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month

Read more

Diabetes News – May 2019

Diabetes News – April 2019

April is National Gardening Month

What Are Some of the Health Benefits of Gardening With Diabetes?

Exercise is one of the main benefits.

Did you know to clear land for 30 minutes burns around 200 calories while weeding for 30 minutes burns about 182 calories, and planting bulbs or seeds for half an hour burns about 162 calories?

Bending, walking and stretching all help keep your heart and body healthy. Use rainwater collected in a barrel to water plants with an old-style watering can rather than using a hosepipe or sprinkler system. This method adds to the number of steps you do each day, tones up arms and avoids water wastage too.

Growing your own produce means you are much more likely to want to eat it. Nothing beats the flavor of something you have made from scratch with your own ingredients. Think of all the yummy dishes you can create, like this one:

Tomato Cucumber Salad        

Ingredients

  • 2 cups tomatoes, cut into bite sized pieces

(cherry and Roma tomatoes work well)

  • 3 cups cucumbers, sliced into 1/4” coins
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 Tablespoons red onions, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh basil leaves, chopped

Instructions

  1. Add cherry tomatoes and cucumbers to a bowl. 
  2. Drizzle olive oil and vinegar on top. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Toss everything to coat. Garnish with diced red onion and fresh basil.
  4. Chill, covered in refrigerator until ready to serve.

COMMUNITY OFFERINGS:

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Norwalk Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Ruggles’ Office 348 Milan Ave. Suite 2 Norwalk, OH

Saturday April 20, 2019

7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Kuns’ Office 101 South Washington Castalia, OH

Saturday May 11

7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

WHEN:

April 10, 2019– May 15, 2019            5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

WHERE:

Townsend School Computer Lab
207 Lowell Street, Castalia

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger

419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

Additional dates and locations:

WHEN:

April 22, 2019 – May 27, 2019           5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

WHERE:

Ritter Library

5680 Liberty Avenue, Vermilion

WHEN:

May 9, 2019 – June13, 2019              6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

WHERE:

Sandusky Library       

114 E Adams Street, Sandusky

WHEN:

July 10, 2019 – August 14, 2019        1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

WHERE:

Kelleys Island School

528 Division Street, Kelleys Island

Cost is free, but you must pre-register.

Diabetes News – March 2019

Diabetes News – February 2019