Diabetes News – June 2022

June is National Men’s Health Month

Out of the 15 leading causes of death, men lead women in all of them except Alzheimer’s disease, which many men don’t live long enough to develop. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, men die five years earlier than women and die at higher rates from three leading causes of death: heart disease, cancer, and unintentional injuries.

Hosted by Men’s Health Network since 1992, Men’s Health Month is dedicated to enriching men’s health and wellness through a broad spectrum of national screening and educational campaigns. The Men’s Health Network (MHN) reports that men die at higher rates than women from the these 10 causes of death – heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, accidents, pneumonia and influenza, diabetes, suicide, kidney disease, and chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Many of the top 10 causes of death are preventable, and can be treated, if found early. Here is a list of things that you should check for:

HEART HEALTH – Heart disease remains the #1 threat to men’s health.

GETTING CHECKED REGULARLY – Early detection and screening is important. The lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer is in 1 in 8 men.

CHECK YOURSELF – A monthly self-exam may just save a young man’s life!

CHECKING FOR RED FLAGS – Erectile dysfunction in young men may be the first warning sign for cardiovascular (heart) disease.

WORKOUT – Exercising 30 minutes a day, 5x a week will help maintain a healthy body weight and lead to better mood, improved, and heart health.

HYDRATE – 8 glasses of water a day may keep kidney stones away.

URINARY SYMPTOMS – Frequency, urgency, waking up at night, or a weak stream are signs of an enlarged prostate.  Prostate cancer tends not to have symptoms.

EAT WELL – Add 1 fruit and vegetable to each meal for clean, healthy eating.

To improve men’s health, it’s important to raise awareness about preventive screenings and regular health care for men of all ages.

SOURCE: https://www.menshealthnetwork.org/

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthier tweak

To hot to cook? Try this recipe for a chill meal.

Chopped Mexican Salad with Lime

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup lime juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
  • 3 clove garlic (minced)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp honey
  • 6 cup romaine lettuce (chopped)
  • 15 oz black beans (rinsed and drained)
  • 1 cup jicama (peeled and chopped)
  • 1 (15-oz) can corn (drained and rinsed)
  • 1 red bell pepper (cored, seeded, and diced)
  • 1 ripe avocados (peeled and diced)
  • 1/2 cup reduced fat monterey jack cheese

DIRECTIONS

  1. To make the dressing, in a small bowl whisk together lime juice, olive oil, crushed red pepper flakes, garlic, and honey. Dressing is best served at room temperature.
  2. Spread lettuce evenly across a large serving platter.
  3. Arrange beans, jicama, corn, bell pepper, and avocados side by side on top of lettuce.
  4. Garnish with cheese.
  5. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, for at least 1 hour.
  6. Drizzle with dressing before serving.

SOURCE: https://www.diabetesfoodhub.org/

 

Community offerings: *

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Ellinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, July 16

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, Aug 13

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, Sep 10

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45.
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25.
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30.
  • Vitamin D – $35.
  • TSH – $25

 

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:

  • Wear a mask
  • Have your temperature taken upon arrival
  • Follow social distancing practices

Please note

  • Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
  • Walk-ins will not be accepted
  • Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
  • We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

Diabetes News – May 2022

May is Stroke Awareness Month

A stroke happens when the blood supply to part of your brain is suddenly interrupted. Then brain tissue is damaged. Most strokes happen because a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain or neck. A stroke can cause movement problems, pain, numbness and problems with thinking, remembering or speaking. Some people also have emotional problems, such as depression, after a stroke.

If you have diabetes, your chances of having a stroke are 1.5 times higher than in people who don’t have diabetes. But your risk is even greater if:

  • you’re over age 55
  • your family background is African American
  • you’ve already had a stroke or a transient ischemic (ih-SKEE-mik) attack (also called a TIA or a mini-stroke)
  • you have a family history of stroke or TIAs
  • you have heart disease
  • you have high blood pressure
  • you’re overweight
  • you have high LDL (bad) cholesterol and low HDL (good) cholesterol levels
  • you are not physically active
  • you smoke

You can’t change some of these risk factors. But you can lower your chances of having a stroke by taking care of your diabetes and tackling some of the other risk factors, such as losing weight if you’re overweight.

Typical warning signs of a stroke develop suddenly and can include:

  • weakness or numbness on one side of the body
  • sudden confusion or trouble understanding
  • trouble talking
  • dizziness, loss of balance, or trouble walking
  • trouble seeing out of one or both eyes
  • double vision
  • severe headache

If you have warning signs of a stroke, call 9-1-1 right away. Getting treatment as soon as possible after a stroke can help prevent permanent damage to your brain.

For more information on Strokes: https://www.stroke.org/

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthy tweak

This recipe is simple, cool and refreshing. Best served with whatever you like!

 ASIAN SESAME SLAW

Salad:

  • 1/2 small head of green cabbage, thinly sliced or grated
  • 1/2 small head of red cabbage, thinly sliced or grated
  • 6 green onions, sliced diagonally
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and coarsely grated
  • 1 Tbsp sesame seeds, white or black, toasted (15 mL)

Dressing:

  • 1/3 cup seasoned rice vinegar (75 mL)
  • 1/4 cup canola oil (60 mL)
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp grated fresh ginger (5 mL)
  • 1 tsp sodium-reduced soy sauce (5 mL)
  • 1 tsp sesame oil (5 mL)

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, combine both cabbages, onion, carrot and sesame seeds.
  2. Prepare dressing by shaking together rice vinegar, canola oil, garlic, ginger, soy sauce and sesame oil.
  3. Pour dressing over salad, toss and refrigerate before serving. Ideally, allow to stand in fridge for an hour or more to allow flavours to mellow. Re-toss before serving.
  1. Recipe Yield: Yield: 8 servings. Serving Size: 1/2 cup (125 mL)

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:

Calories: 100
Fat: 8 grams
Saturated Fat: 0.5 grams
Fiber: 3 grams
Sodium: 170 milligrams
Protein: 2 grams
Carbohydrates: 7 grams
Sugars: 4 grams

Recipe and image appear courtesy of CanolaInfo.org

 

Community offerings: *

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Ellinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness

 

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, May 14

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, June 4

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, July 16

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, Aug 13

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, Sep 10

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45.
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25.
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30.
  • Vitamin D – $35.
  • TSH – $25

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:

  • Wear a mask
  • Have your temperature taken upon arrival
  • Follow social distancing practices

Please note

  • Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
  • Walk-ins will not be accepted
  • Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
  • We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – April 2022

APRIL IS NATIONAL STRESS AWARENESS MONTH

And who isn’t a little bit stressed right now? Diabetes management is a lifelong process. This can add stress to your daily life. Stress can be a major barrier to effective glucose control. Stress hormones in your body may directly affect glucose levels. If you’re experiencing stress or feeling threatened, your body reacts. This is called the fight-or-flight response. This response elevates your hormone levels and causes your nerve cells to fire.

During this response, your body releases adrenaline and cortisol into your bloodstream and your respiratory rates increase. Your body directs blood to the muscles and limbs, allowing you to fight the situation. Your body may not be able to process the glucose released by your firing nerve cells if you have diabetes. If you can’t convert the glucose into energy, it builds up in the bloodstream. This causes your blood glucose levels to rise.

Constant stress from long-term problems with blood glucose can also wear you down mentally and physically. This may make managing your diabetes difficult. There are many healthy ways to decrease your stress. If you’re feeling stressed about your condition, know that you aren’t alone. You can connect with people online or in your community for solidarity and support.

Online support groups

You can often find online support groups that offers helpful tips and a strong community to help you cope. Diabetic Connect is an online resource dedicated to improving your quality of life. It provides articles, recipes, and informative videos.

In-person support groups

For women with diabetes, Diabetes Sisters offers nationwide meetups. The group started in North Carolina and expanded due to popularity. They now offer in-person groups throughout the country. These informal meetings are held on weeknights and typically last for one or two hours.

Defeat Diabetes Foundation provides a listing of peer support groups in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. You even search the directory and submit a listing of your own. The American Diabetes Association also offers local offices focused on education and community outreach.

Therapy

You may feel more comfortable talking with a professional about your stress. A therapist can provide coping mechanisms tailored to your individual situation and give you a safe environment to talk. They may also provide medical advice that online or in-person support groups can’t offer. We offer in-house, quality behavioral health treatment at FHS. If you would like to make an appointment, call 419-502-2803, or fill out our new patient form today.

 

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month

Here is a meal that helps to make dinner time stress free.

Penne with Asparagus and Cherry Tomatoes

Total: 15 min

Prep: 5 min

Cook: 10 min

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces whole grain penne pasta
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 1/2 pounds thin asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups (about 9 ounces) cherry tomatoes
  • 1 cup shelled fresh peas
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken stock
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves

Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook until tender but still firm to the bite, stirring occasionally, about 8 to 10 minutes. Drain the pasta, reserving about 1/2 cup of the pasta water.
  2. In a large saute pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the asparagus, season with the salt and pepper, and cook for 3 minutes until slightly soft. Add the cherry tomatoes and peas. Cook for 2 minutes. Pour the chicken stock into the pan and bring the mixture to a simmer. Cook until the tomatoes start to burst and the stock is reduced by half, about 3 minutes.
  3. Transfer the asparagus mixture to a large serving bowl. Add the cooked pasta and 1/2 of the Parmesan. Toss well, adding reserved pasta water, if needed, to loosen the pasta. Garnish with the remaining Parmesan and chopped basil.

Source: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/penne-with-asparagus-and-cherry-tomatoes-spring-recipe-1939598

Community offerings: *

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Ellinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, April 9

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, May 14

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, June 4

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45.
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25.
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30.
  • Vitamin D – $35.
  • TSH – $25

 

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:

  • Wear a mask
  • Have your temperature taken upon arrival
  • Follow social distancing practices

Please note

  • Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
  • Walk-ins will not be accepted
  • Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
  • We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes-and-stress. Accessed 03/20/2020

APRIL IS NATIONAL STRESS AWARENESS MONTH

 

And who isn’t a little bit stressed right now?

Diabetes management is a lifelong process. This can add stress to your daily life. Stress can be a major barrier to effective glucose control. Stress hormones in your body may directly affect glucose levels. If you’re experiencing stress or feeling threatened, your body reacts. This is called the fight-or-flight response. This response elevates your hormone levels and causes your nerve cells to fire.

 

During this response, your body releases adrenaline and cortisol into your bloodstream and your respiratory rates increase. Your body directs blood to the muscles and limbs, allowing you to fight the situation. Your body may not be able to process the glucose released by your firing nerve cells if you have diabetes. If you can’t convert the glucose into energy, it builds up in the bloodstream. This causes your blood glucose levels to rise.

 

Constant stress from long-term problems with blood glucose can also wear you down mentally and physically. This may make managing your diabetes difficult. There are many healthy ways to decrease your stress.

 

How to cope with diabetes-related stress

If you’re feeling stressed about your condition, know that you aren’t alone. You can connect with people online or in your community for solidarity and support.

 

Online support groups

You can often find online support groups that offers helpful tips and a strong community to help you cope. Diabetic Connect is an online resource dedicated to improving your quality of life. It provides articles, recipes, and informative videos.

In-person support groups

For women with diabetes, Diabetes Sisters offers nationwide meetups. The group started in North Carolina and expanded due to popularity. They now offer in-person groups throughout the country. These informal meetings are held on weeknights and typically last for one or two hours.

Defeat Diabetes Foundation provides a listing of peer support groups in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. You even search the directory and submit a listing of your own. The American Diabetes Association also offers local offices focused on education and community outreach.

Therapy

You may feel more comfortable talking with a professional about your stress. A therapist can provide coping mechanisms tailored to your individual situation and give you a safe environment to talk. They may also provide medical advice that online or in-person support groups can’t offer. We offer in-house, quality behavioral health treatment at FHS. If you would like to make an appointment, call 419-502-2803, or fill out our new patient form today.

Purdie, Jennifer. Medically reviewed by Debra Sullivan, PhD, MSN, RN, CNE, COI on April 29, 2016”Stress: How it Affects Diabetes and How to Decrease it”

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month

Here is a meal that helps to make dinner time stress free.

 

Penne with Asparagus and Cherry Tomatoes

Total: 15 min

Prep: 5 min

Cook: 10 min

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

 

Ingredients:

·         8 ounces whole grain penne pasta

·         3 tablespoons olive oil

·         2 garlic cloves, minced

·         1 1/2 pounds thin asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces

·         Salt and freshly ground black pepper

·         2 cups (about 9 ounces) cherry tomatoes

·         1 cup shelled fresh peas

·         1/2 cup low-sodium chicken stock

·         1 cup grated Parmesan

·         2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves

 

Directions:

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook until tender but still firm to the bite, stirring occasionally, about 8 to 10 minutes. Drain the pasta, reserving about 1/2 cup of the pasta water.

 

In a large saute pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the asparagus, season with the salt and pepper, and cook for 3 minutes until slightly soft. Add the cherry tomatoes and peas. Cook for 2 minutes. Pour the chicken stock into the pan and bring the mixture to a simmer. Cook until the tomatoes start to burst and the stock is reduced by half, about 3 minutes.

 

Transfer the asparagus mixture to a large serving bowl. Add the cooked pasta and 1/2 of the Parmesan. Toss well, adding reserved pasta water, if needed, to loosen the pasta. Garnish with the remaining Parmesan and chopped basil.

 

Source: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/penne-with-asparagus-and-cherry-tomatoes-spring-recipe-1939598

Community offerings: *

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Ellinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, April 9

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, May 14

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, June 4

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45.
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25.
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30.
  • Vitamin D – $35.
  • TSH – $25

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:

  • Wear a mask
  • Have your temperature taken upon arrival
  • Follow social distancing practices

Please note

  • Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
  • Walk-ins will not be accepted
  • Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
  • We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – March 2022

MARCH IS NATIONAL KIDNEY MONTH

Diabetic kidney disease is a type of kidney disease caused by diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. About 1 out of 4 adults with diabetes has kidney disease. The main job of the kidneys is to filter wastes and extra water out of your blood to make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure and make hormones that your body needs to stay healthy.

With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood.

Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that has a high sugar level.

Kidney damage from diabetes can get worse over time. However, you can take steps to keep your kidneys healthy and help slow kidney damage to prevent or delay kidney failure. Kidney failure means that your kidneys have lost most of their ability to function—less than 15 percent of normal kidney function. However, most people with diabetes and kidney disease don’t end up with kidney failure.

Healthy lifestyle habits can help you reach your blood glucose and blood pressure goals. Following the steps below will also help you keep your kidneys healthy:

  • Stop smoking.
  • Make physical activity part of your routine.
  • Stay at or get to a healthy weight.
  • Get enough sleep. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night.
  • Take medicines as prescribed

Work with a dietitian to develop a diabetes meal plan and limit salt and sodium.

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthier tweak

Bring some Luck of the Irish into your home with this tasty recipe.

Irish Lamb (or Beef) Stew

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 pounds boneless lamb shoulder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 cup stout beer
  • 2 cups low-sodium beef broth
  • 2 medium carrots
  • 2 medium parsnips
  • 1 cup frozen peas

Preparation

  1. Trim excess fat and cut the lamb into 1-1/2 chunks. Chop the onion and garlic.
  2. Place the lamb pieces on a plate and sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Place flour in a zip top bag. Add lamb and shake to coat meat evenly.
  3. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium heat in a large stockpot or Dutch oven. Add lamb and cook until evenly browned. Remove from the pot and set aside.
  4. Add the onion to the same pot and sauté until translucent. Add chopped garlic and stir for 1 minute. Add 1/2 cup beef broth and stir to deglaze the pot.
  5. Add lamb, beef broth, beer, tomato sauce and thyme to the pot. Bring to a boil, then cover and reduce to low heat. Simmer for 1 hour.
  6. Peel and cut carrots and parsnips into 1-inch pieces. Stir vegetables into stew, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Add green peas and cook 5 to 10 minutes.

Helpful hints

Cook longer if you like very soft cooked vegetable.

Buy 2-1/2 pounds lamb shoulder chops and trim fat and bones if boneless lamb shoulder is unavailable. Substitute 1-1/2 pounds beef stew meat for lamb if desired.

Replacing traditional potatoes with parsnips helps reduce potassium content.

For a lower protein diet reduce lamb to 3/4 pound. Protein is reduced to 15 grams.

Source: DaVita dietitian Sara from California.

 

 

Community offerings: *

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Ellinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, March 12

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, April 9

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, May 14

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Firelands Sandusky HealthCare Center

2520 Columbus Ave.

Sandusky, OH 44870

Saturday, June 4

7:00 am to 9:30 pm

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45.
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25.
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30.
  • Vitamin D – $35.
  • TSH – $25

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:

  • Wear a mask
  • Have your temperature taken upon arrival
  • Follow social distancing practices

Please note

  • Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
  • Walk-ins will not be accepted
  • Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
  • We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 72% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

Diabetes News – February 2022

February is National American Heart Month

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. As of 2018, 30.3 million U.S. adults were diagnosed with heart disease. Every year, about 647,000 Americans die from heart disease, making it the leading cause of death in the United States. Heart disease causes 1 out of every 4 deaths. To help prevent heart disease and increase awareness of its effects, Family Health Services is proudly participating in American Heart Month. Source: healthline.com

What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke?

Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.

People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.

The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. To lower your risk:
Manage your diabetes ABCs

Knowing your diabetes ABCs will help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stopping smoking and maintaining a healthy weight if you have diabetes is also important to lower your chances for heart disease.

A is for the A1C test. The A1C test shows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. This is different from the blood glucose checks that you do every day. The higher your A1C number, the higher your blood glucose levels have been during the past 3 months. High levels of blood glucose can harm your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes.

The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7 percent. Some people may do better with a slightly higher A1C goal. Ask your health care team what your goal should be.

B is for blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force of your blood against the wall of your blood vessels. If your blood pressure gets too high, it makes your heart work too hard. High blood pressure can cause a heart attack or stroke and damage your kidneys and eyes.
The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be.

C is for cholesterol. You have two kinds of cholesterol in your blood: LDL and HDL. LDL or “bad” cholesterol can build up and clog your blood vessels. Too much bad cholesterol can cause a heart attack or stroke. HDL or “good” cholesterol helps remove the “bad” cholesterol from your blood vessels.

Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. If you are over 40 years of age, you may need to take medicine such as a statin to lower your cholesterol and protect your heart. Some people with very high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol may need to take medicine at a younger age.
S is for stop smoking. Not smoking is especially important for people with diabetes because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels, so your heart has to work harder.
Since this month is all about the heart, let’s talk about something you are going to love (and it’s good for you).

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthier tweak
Southwest Breakfast Quiche

Ingredients

• nonstick cooking spray
• 3 eggs
• ¼ C whole wheat flour
• ½ tsp baking powder
• ½ C egg whites or egg substitute
• ¼ C skim milk
• 7 oz canned green chiles
• 1 C fat free cottage cheese (whipped in a food processor until smooth)
• 1 C reduced fat shredded cheddar cheese

DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 400º F. Coat a 9-inch round or square baking dish with canola cooking spray; set aside.
2. In mixer bowl, combine eggs, flour, and baking powder, and beat until blended. Add egg whites and milk and beat until smooth. On low speed, beat in green chilis, cottage cheese and shredded cheese.
3. Pour mixture into prepared dish and bake for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350-degrees and bake for about 25 minutes more (until quiche is firm in the center and top is golden brown). Cut into 6 equal slices and serve as is or top with salsa, avocado or plain Greek yogurt. Source: https://www.diabetesfoodhub.org

 

 

Community offerings: *
* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.
Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.
If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST: Free
CONTACT: Tina Elmlinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic. Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center
The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm. This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1. A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING

offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center
You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.
Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus
1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

7:00 am -9:30 am on the following dates:

  • Saturday, February 19
  • Saturday, March 12
  • Saturday, April 9
  • Saturday, May 14

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

• Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45.
• Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25.
• PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30.
• Vitamin D – $35.
• TSH – $25

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:
• Wear a mask
• Have your temperature taken upon arrival
• Follow social distancing practices

Please note
• Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
• Walk-ins will not be accepted
• Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
• We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.
Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – January 2022

January is National Blood Donor Month

Due to increased seasonal illnesses during the winter months and inclement weather conditions, donations of blood and platelets decline, and demand increases. The American Red Ross and Blood Banks of America encourage everyone can donate to continue their donations. Those who have never donated, to make an appointment. Blood donation is safer than ever before and saves lives. Millions of people including cancer patients, organ recipients, and victims of accidents; rely on blood donations from people like you and me.

Here are some of the biggest reasons giving blood is so important.

  1. About 36,000 units of red blood cells and 7,000 units of platelets are needed every single day in the U.S.
  2. The most requested blood type by hospitals is type O. This kind of blood can be transfused to patients of all blood types, so it’s always in great demand and very short supply. Only 7% of people in the U.S. have type O.
  3. A single-car accident victim may need up to 100 pints of blood to survive.
  4. About 6.8 million people donate blood every year in the U.S.
  5. 38% of our population is eligible to donate, but less than 10% actually do.
  6. Donating blood is a simple, safe process. All you have to do is register, take a mini-medical history test, donate, and then accept free refreshments like water, Gatorade, granola bars, etc.
  7. A single donation from a single patient can help more than one person.

As COVID-19 cases have risen across the U.S., so has the need for convalescent plasma – leading to a shortage of this potentially lifesaving blood product.

There are two ways those who have recovered from COVID-19 can make a big difference:

  • A convalescent plasma donation: The Red Cross is collecting convalescent plasma at over 170 locations throughout the country. If you’ve recovered from COVID-19, you may be eligible to donate your plasma to help others going through COVID-19 treatment. Fill out the eligibility form to start the process.
  • A whole blood donation: Plasma from whole blood donations that test positive for COVID-19 antibodies may be used to help COVID-19 patients. Make an appointment to give blood by downloading the free Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Kick off the year by making a lifesaving donation this National Blood Donor Month.

Source: https://www.redcross.org

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month

January is also National Oatmeal Month. Great taste, easy to make with plenty of fun options, not to mention healthy and filling.

Overnight Oatmeal with Milk

Prep: 10 minutes
Additional: 8 hours
Total: 8 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 4
Yield: 4 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 cups low-fat milk, almond milk, or soy milk
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 fresh fruit, chopped
  • ⅓ cup pine nuts, or chopped nuts
  • 2 tablespoons agave nectar or sugar substitute (optional)

Step 1: Combine milk, oats, lemon zest, and vanilla extract in a large bowl. Cover and refrigerate until oats have absorbed milk, 8 hours to overnight.

Step 2: Stir fruit, nuts, and agave nectar (sugar substitute) into the oatmeal.

Be creative, combine your favorite flavors. Try adding chia seeds or pumpkin seeds.

 

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:

319 calories; protein 12.3g; carbohydrates 44.8g; fat 10.9g; cholesterol 9.8mg; sodium 53.2mg.

Source: By Totally Fit & Fabulous

 

Community offerings: *

 

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Ellinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness

 

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, February 19

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, March 12

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, April 9

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, May 14

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

 

Please comply with the following COVID-19 precautions:

  • Wear a mask
  • Have your temperature taken upon arrival
  • Follow social distancing practices

Please note

  • Patients will not be allowed to enter until their scheduled time
  • Walk-ins will not be accepted
  • Only the registered patient will be allowed to enter the screening unless the patient needs assistance from an accompanying person
  • We are unable to perform any additional physician-ordered tests not included in the list above.

Contact: Centralized Scheduling at 419-557-7840 to pre-register

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

Diabetes News – December 2021

December is National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month

Almost everybody loves holiday parties. But drinking and driving can make that festive time deadly for drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. December’s National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month has a high fatality rate due to people driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both. According to the National Safety Council, over 40,000 people died in alcohol-related traffic accidents last year, so this year, stay safe during the holidays. If you are a diabetic, there are some additional things you should know about alcohol use.

Diabetes, Alcohol, and Social Drinking

People with diabetes should be particularly cautious when it comes to drinking alcohol because alcohol can make some of the complications of diabetes worse. First of all, alcohol impacts the liver in doing its job of regulating blood sugar. Alcohol can also interact with some medications that are prescribed to people with diabetes. Even if you only rarely drink alcohol, talk with your healthcare provider about it so that he or she knows which medications are best for you.

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Alcohol interacts with diabetes medications

Alcohol can cause blood glucose levels to rise or fall, depending on how much you drink. Some diabetes pills (including sulfonylureas and meglitinides) also lower blood glucose levels by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin. Combining the blood-sugar-lowering effects of the medication with alcohol can lead to hypoglycemia or “insulin shock,” which is a medical emergency.

  1. Alcohol prevents your liver from doing its job

The main function of your liver is to store glycogen, which is the stored form of glucose, so that you will have a source of glucose when you haven’t eaten. When you drink alcohol, your liver has to work to remove it from your blood instead of working to regulate blood sugar, or blood glucose. For this reason, you should never drink alcohol when your blood glucose is already low.

  1. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach

Food slows down the rate at which alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream. Be sure to eat a meal or snack containing carbohydrates if you are going to drink alcohol.

  1. Always test blood sugar before having an alcoholic beverage

Alcohol impairs your liver’s ability to produce glucose, so be sure to know your blood glucose number before you drink an alcoholic beverage.

  1. Alcohol can cause hypoglycemia

Within a few minutes of drinking alcohol, and for up to 12 hours afterward, alcohol can cause your blood glucose level to drop. After consuming alcohol, always check your blood glucose level to make sure it is in the safe zone. If your blood glucose is low, eat a snack to bring it up.

  1. You can save your life by drinking slowly

Drinking too much alcohol can make you feel dizzy, sleepy, and disoriented—the same symptoms as hypoglycemia. Be sure to wear a bracelet that alerts people around you to the fact that you have diabetes, so that if you start to behave like you are intoxicated, they know that your symptoms could be caused by hypoglycemia. If you are hypoglycemic, you need food and/or glucose tablets to raise your blood glucose level.

  1. You can save your life by knowing your limit

Your healthcare provider will tell you how much alcohol is safe for you to drink. Depending on your health condition, that may mean no alcohol at all. In some cases, women with diabetes may have no more than one alcoholic beverage a day. Men should have no more than two.


The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month

Snowy weather is on its way, but you can enjoy your Snowballs inside where it’s warm and cozy.

 

Almond Snowballs

 Ingredients

2 egg white

Pinch of coarse salt

1/3 C sugar

1 ½ C (6 ounces) shredded coconut

1 tsp almond extract

¼ tsp ground nutmeg

3 TBSP all-purpose flour

9 candied cherries, halved

¼ C sliced almonds

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a mixing bowl, beat egg whites and salt to soft peaks, then add sugar and beat again until peaks are stiff. Beat in almond flavoring. Using a rubber spatula or wooden spoon, stir in half of the coconut. Sprinkle in the nutmeg and flour, stir, then fold in the remaining coconut.
  3. Using a melon baller or other small scoop, or working with 2 spoons, form 9 “snowballs” a couple of inches apart on each of 2 cookie sheets. Bake snowballs 12 to 15 minutes, until lightly golden. Remove from oven and garnish each snowball with half a cherry and a couple of slivered almonds. Transfer to a rack or serving plate to cool.

Source: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/almond-snowballs-recipe-1942070

 

Community offerings: *

* Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.


 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:  Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

 

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, December 4

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

Diabetes News – November 2021

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

This year’s focus is on prediabetes and preventing diabetes.

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, more than 1 in 3 U.S. adults have prediabetes—that’s 88 million people—but the majority of people don’t know they have it.

The good news is that by making small healthy lifestyle changes, it is possible to prevent type 2 diabetes and even reverse your prediabetes.

Here are some tips to help manage prediabetes and prevent diabetes.

  • Take small steps. Making changes to your lifestyle and daily habits can be hard, but you don’t have to change everything at once. It is okay to start small. Remember that setbacks are normal and do not mean you have failed—the key is to get back on track as soon as you can.
  • Move more. Limit time spent sitting and try to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity, 5 days a week. Start slowly by breaking it up throughout the day.
  • Choose healthier foods and drinks most of the time. Pick foods that are high in fiber and low in fat and sugar. Build a plate that includes a balance of vegetables, protein, and carbohydrates. Drink water instead of sweetened drinks.
  • Lose weight, track it, and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.
  • Seek support. It is possible to reverse prediabetes. Making a plan, tracking your progress, and getting support from your health care professional and loved ones can help you make the necessary lifestyle changes.
  • Stay up to date on vaccinations. The COVID-19 (booster shot, if eligible) and flu vaccines are especially important for people who may be more likely to get very sick from COVID-19 or the flu, such as people with diabetes.

 

(Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease https://www.niddk.nih.gov and American Diabetes Association https://diabetes.org)

 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month

Fall Harvest Roasted Butternut Squash and Pomegranate Salad

Prep Time 15 mins

Cook Time 30 mins

Total Time 45 mins

Ingredients

  • 2tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1small butternut squash, halved, peeled, and cut into 1/4 inch half circles (substitute Acorn squash or pumpkin, as desired)
  • 2tablespoons honey
  • 1/2cup raw pepitas
  • 1teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1head kale, shredded
  • 4cups shredded brussels sprouts
  • arils from 1 pomegranate
  • 4-6fresh figs (optional)
  • 1/2cup shredded gouda cheese

Pomegranate Vinaigrette

  • 1/4cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1shallot, thinly sliced
  • 1tablespoon chopped fresh sage
  • 1/4cup pomegranate juice
  • 2tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2tablespoons honey
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • 1pinch crushed red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. On a baking sheet, toss together the butternut squash, 1 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon honey, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, and a pinch each of salt and pepper. Transfer to the oven and roast for 25-30 minutes, flipping halfway through cooking, until the squash is tender.
  2. Line a separate baking sheet with parchment paper. Add the pepitas, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 tablespoon honey, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, the cayenne, and a pinch of salt. Arrange in a single layer. Transfer to the oven and bake for 8-10 minutes or until the pepitas are toasted. Watch closely!
  3. Meanwhile, in a large salad bowl, combine the kale, brussels sprouts, and pomegranates.
  4. To make the vinaigrette. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over high heat. When the oil shimmers, add the shallots and sage, cook until fragrant, 2-3 minutes. Remove from the heat, let cool slightly. Add the pomegranate juice, balsamic vinegar, and honey. Season with salt, pepper, and crushed red pepper flakes.
  5. Pour the vinaigrette over the salad, tossing to combine. Add the roasted squash, gently tossing. Top the salad with toasted pepitas, figs, if using, and cheese. Eat and enjoy!

Notes

To Make Ahead: This salad can be made and assembled through step 4. Combine the greens, pomegranates, and roasted squash in a salad bowl, but leave the seeds out. Store the bowl in the fridge, covered, and keep the seeds and vinaigrette separate. Then, just before serving, warm the vinaigrette and toss the salad together.

Leftovers: leftovers will keep well for 2-3 days. This salad is delicious warmed or chilled.

 

(Source: https://www.halfbakedharvest.com)

 

Community offerings: 

Due to coronavirus/COVID 19, many community offerings have been changed, postponed, or canceled. Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST: Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENINGS

Offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center. You must pre-register for all lab work at 419-557-7840.

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, November 6

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, December 4

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30
  • Vitamin D – $35
  • TSH – $25

 

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

Diabetes News – October 2021

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast cancer doesn’t discriminate. ​Although breast cancer is more prevalent among American white women, African-American women tend to die from the disease more often. Overall, only one percent of American males are diagnosed with breast cancer, but African-American men just like women in their community, are more prone to die from the disease. An estimated 2,670 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the United States and approximately 500 will die. 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, except for skin cancers.

A risk factor is anything that increases your chances of getting a disease, such as breast cancer. But having a risk factor, or even many, does not mean that you are sure to get the disease. Certain breast cancer risk factors are related to personal behaviors, such as diet and exercise. Other lifestyle-related risk factors include decisions about having children and taking medicines that contain hormones.

Lifestyle-related Breast Cancer Risk Factors include:

  • Drinking Alcohol – The American Cancer Society recommends that women who drink have no more than 1 drink a day.
  • Being Overweight or Obese – being overweight after menopause is more strongly linked with an increased risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, whereas some research suggests that being overweight before menopause might increase your risk of the less common triple-negative breast cancer.
  • Not being physically active – The American Cancer Society recommends that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week (or a combination of these), preferably spread throughout the week.

For women:

  • Not having children – Women who have not had children or who had their first child after age 30 have a slightly higher breast cancer risk overall.
  • Not breastfeeding -breastfeeding may slightly lower breast cancer risk, especially if it’s continued for a year or more
  • Birth Control – Some birth control methods use hormones, which might increase breast cancer risk.
  • Hormone therapy after menopause – Use of combined hormone therapy after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer
  • Breast Implants -implants have not been linked with an increased risk of the most common types of breast cancer. However, they have been linked to a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma called breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL)

Many of these risk factors overlap with diabetic risk factors/preventions. Higher insulin levels have been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer. Managing your diabetes by keeping a healthy insulin level and lifestyle, you may also lessen your risk factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer is sometimes found after symptoms appear, but many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. This is why regular breast cancer screening is so important. Talk to you PCP about risk factors, screenings and other things you can do for disease prevention and/or treatment.

If you don’t have insurance or your insurance doesn’t cover mammograms, the resources below may help you find a low-cost or free mammogram (or help with the cost).

  • The Komen Breast Care Helpline can help you find low-cost breast cancer screening in your area. Call the helpline at 1-877 GO KOMEN (1-877-465-6636) Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. ET.
  • Some Komen Affiliates fund breast cancer education and screening projects in their communities. Find a local Affiliate and learn about programs in your area.
  • The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provides access to breast cancer screening to low-income, uninsured and underinsured women ages 40-64. It also provides access to diagnostic testing if results are abnormal, and referrals to treatment if breast cancer is diagnosed.

Call today to discuss getting your mammogram scheduled: 419-502-2800


 

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month with a healthy tweak

Pumpkin pie flavors, decorations, lattes and candles Pumpkins here, pumpkins there, pumpkins everywhere!  When you carve you Jack-O-Lantern, save those seeds for a wonderfully Halloween treat!

Easy Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

  • Prep 10 minutes
  • Cook 25 minutes
  • Total Time 35 minutes
  • Makes 1 1/2 cups

Season pumpkin seeds with almost anything from your spice cabinet, don’t be afraid to try something new. Boiling the seeds in salted water for 5 minutes before roasting helps to clean and season them. Before baking, pat the boiled seeds very dry otherwise they will not brown or crisp.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt, plus more for serving
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil, melted coconut oil or nut oil like walnut
  • 2 teaspoons your favorite spice blend such as curry powder, harissa and chili powder ( or your choice)

DIRECTIONS

  1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Fill a medium saucepan with about 2 cups of water and season with 2 teaspoons salt. Bring to a boil.
  3. Meanwhile, scoop the seeds from your pumpkin. Add the pumpkin seeds to a bowl filled with cold water and swish them around until the seeds float and are mostly clean.
  4. Add cleaned seeds to the boiling salted water. Simmer for 5 minutes. Drain and pull away any remaining pumpkin attached to the seeds.
  5. Scatter the seeds onto clean dishcloths and pat them very dry. Mound the dried seeds onto the prepared baking sheet. Add the oil and any spices on top then toss until well coated. Spread the seeds into one layer. Bake, stirring the seeds at least once (recommend every 10 minutes), until fragrant and golden around the edges, 20 to 35 minutes, depending on how large the seeds are.

NUTRITION PER SERVING: Serving Size 2 tablespoons / Calories 105 / Protein 5 g / Carbohydrate 2 g / Dietary Fiber 1 g / Total Sugars 0 g / Total Fat 9 g / Saturated Fat 2 g / Cholesterol 0 mg


 

Community offerings: *

* Many community offerings have been postponed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times. If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634) Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST: Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840. Please VERIFY THE LOCATION when you register. FRMC will be opening a new location at 2520 Columbus Ave. (in front of Kroger) soon.

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, October 9

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, November 6

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, December 4

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – September 2021

September is Healthy Aging Month

 

Here are 10 Tips For Healthy Aging

 

1. Be realistic

If you feel overwhelmed by some activities (yours and/or your family’s), learn to say NO! Eliminate an activity that is not absolutely necessary. You may be taking on more responsibility than you can or should handle. If you meet resistance, give reasons why you’re making the changes. Be willing to listen to other’s suggestions and be ready to compromise.

2. Shed the “superhero” urge

No one is perfect, so don’t expect perfection from yourself or others. Ask yourself, “What really needs to be done?” How much can I do? Is the deadline realistic? What adjustments can I make?” Don’t hesitate to ask for help if you need it.

3. Take one thing at a time

For people under tension or stress, an ordinary workload can sometimes seem unbearable. The best way to cope with this feeling of being overwhelmed is to take one task at a time. Pick one urgent task and work on it. Once you accomplish that task, choose the next one. The positive feeling of “checking off” tasks is very satisfying. It will motivate you to keep going.

4. Move more, sit less

The first key guideline for adults is to move more and sit less. This recommendation from health.gov is based on new evidence that shows a strong positive relationship between increased sedentary behavior and increased risk of all-cause mortality, heart disease, and high blood pressure. All physical activity, especially moderate-to-vigorous activity, can help offset these risks. Even for inactive adults, replacing sedentary behavior with light-intensity physical activity is likely to produce some health benefits.

5. Aerobic exercise

For substantial health benefits, adults should do at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) to 300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) to 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity. Preferably, it would be best if you spread aerobic exercise throughout the week.

6. Muscle strengthening

Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities of moderate or greater intensity, involving all major muscle groups on two or more days a week, as these activities provide additional health benefits.

7. Review your daily diet and make necessary changes

Choose a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products; includes a variety of protein foods such as seafood, lean meats, and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), soy products, nuts, and seeds. Chose a diet low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars and stay within your daily calorie needs

8. Volunteer

Change the world by volunteering. Become a United Nations Volunteer. The UN Volunteers website currently lists over 150 ideas from around the world. Here are a few examples: volunteer to make a field hockey website for kids in Sierra Leone, Africa; write up UN volunteer stories from the Asia Pacific; teach elementary students via Skype in southern India once a week. Or you can volunteer to translate, proofread and develop websites.

9. Dream and then get to it

Visit the U.S. National Parks in Google Earth which brings the national parks to you in a Google Earth guided tour through 31 different parks around the country.

The producers of the National Parks program hope that “Once you’ve virtually explored the national parks in Google Earth, we encourage you to put down your phone, put on some sunscreen and get outside to explore the wonders that our parks system has to offer. Start by finding the park closest to you.

10. Launch your next career

Capitalize on your career experience and start a new one. Yes, enjoy a brief “retirement.” Travel, spend more time with family and friends. Develop new hobbies. And, then become an entrepreneur. Statistics show people who retire and do nothing are more likely to die within 3 years.

Source: https://healthyaging.net/healthy-aging-month/10-tips-for-september-is-healthy-aging-month-2021/


The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just as tasty but with a healthy tweak here and there.

Raspberry-Lemon Chiffon Icebox Cake

Makes 10 servings (10 slices)

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of raspberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 2¼ teaspoons fat-free, sugar-free, reduced-calorie lemon instant pudding mix
  • ½ cup nonfat milk
  • 1¼ teaspoons unflavored gelatin
  • 8 oz. container of frozen light whipped topping (thawed)
  • 4 finely crushed graham crackers
  • 2 Tablespoons of melted butter or butter substitute
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar (substitutes not recommended for this recipe)
  • ½ cup water

Instructions

  1. Coat an 8×4-inch loaf pan with cooking spray.  Line with a double layer of plastic wrap, letting it overhang 2 inches on the sides.
  2. Combine the berries and ¼ cup water in a saucepan.  Mash the berries then bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes.  Press the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve and discard the seeds.  Return to the saucepan and stir in the sugar.  Return to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes until reduced to ½ cup. Let it cool slightly.
  3. Add the remaining ¼ cup water to a small saucepan and sprinkle gelatin on top (do not stir).  Let stand 5 minutes.  On medium heat, stir until the gelatin is dissolved.  Combine the gelatin mixture, berry mixture and ½ cup whipped topping and mix it all together.  Add another ½ cup whipped topping until there are no streaks.  Spoon the mixture into the prepared pan, cover and refrigerate until set (about 1 hour).
  4. Whisk milk and pudding mix in bowl until thick. Add ⅓ of the remaining whipped topping until combined, then fold in the remaining whipped topping until no streaks remain and spread it over the raspberry layer.
  5. Combine the graham cracker crumbs and melted butter in a bowl.  Gently press the mixture onto the pudding layer.  Cover and refrigerate for 1 to 8 hours.
  6. Use the overhanging plastic wrap to remove the cake from the pan.  Invert onto your serving plate.  Garnish with additional berries if you choose.

 

Source:  Diabetic Living Magazine & EatingWell.com


Community offerings:

Many community offerings have been postponed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times. If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634) or visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST: Free

CONTACT: Tina Elmlinger 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP, CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, September 11

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, October 9

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, November 6

7:00 am -9:30 am

 

Sandusky Health & Wellness

Firelands Regional Medical Center South Campus

1912 Hayes Avenue Sandusky, OH

Saturday, December 4

7:00 am -9:30 am

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL, and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three-month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.