Diabetes News – February 2021

February is National American Heart Month

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. 28,291 Erie County adults had been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Locally, Heart Disease was the leading cause of death* To help prevent heart disease and increase awareness of its effects, Family Health Services is proudly participating in American Heart Month.

(Source: Ohio Public Health Data Warehouse, 2015-2017)

What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke?

Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.

People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.

The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. To lower your risk:

Manage your diabetes ABCs

Knowing your diabetes ABCs will help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stopping smoking and maintaining a healthy weight if you have diabetes is also important to lower your chances for heart disease.

A is for the A1C test. The A1C test shows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. This is different from the blood glucose checks that you do every day. The higher your A1C number, the higher your blood glucose levels have been during the past 3 months. High levels of blood glucose can harm your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes.

The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7 percent. Some people may do better with a slightly higher A1C goal. Ask your health care team what your goal should be.

B is for blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force of your blood against the wall of your blood vessels. If your blood pressure gets too high, it makes your heart work too hard. High blood pressure can cause a heart attack or stroke and damage your kidneys and eyes.

The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be.

C is for cholesterol. You have two kinds of cholesterol in your blood: LDL and HDL. LDL or “bad” cholesterol can build up and clog your blood vessels. Too much bad cholesterol can cause a heart attack or stroke. HDL or “good” cholesterol helps remove the “bad” cholesterol from your blood vessels.

Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. If you are over 40 years of age, you may need to take medicine such as a statin to lower your cholesterol and protect your heart. Some people with very high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol may need to take medicine at a younger age.

S is for stop smoking. Not smoking is especially important for people with diabetes because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels, so your heart has to work harder.

Since this month is all about the heart, let’s talk about something you are going to love (and it’s good for you).


The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthier tweak

STRAWBERRY PANNA COTTAS

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
  • 1-1/2 pints strawberries, halved
  • 2 tablespoons Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 pint strawberries, sliced

Directions

  1. Sprinkle gelatin over milk in a small saucepan; let stand 1 minute. Cook over low heat, stirring until gelatin dissolves (do not boil). Set aside to cool.
  2. Process 1-1/2 pints strawberries in a food processor, or until pureed, stopping to scrape down sides. Press strawberries through a fine wire-mesh strainer into a bowl, discarding solids. Stir cooled milk mixture into strawberry puree. Add Splenda Granulated Sweetener and vanilla, stirring until Splenda Granulated Sweetener dissolves.
  3. Coat 4 (6-ounce) ramekins with cooking spray. Divide strawberry mixture evenly among ramekins. If you don’t have ramekins, you can use 6 ounce clear plastic cups and serve the dessert in these or use coffee mugs and continue with the following directions.  Cover each ramekin with plastic wrap; refrigerate 4 hours or overnight until panna cottas are set.
  4. Run a knife around the edge of each panna cotta and unmold onto serving plates. Serve with sliced strawberries. Top with fresh berries, mint leaves or chocolate curls.

Recipe and image appear courtesy of Splenda.


*Community offerings*

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19. Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates, and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634) or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) – Erie County Senior Center

COST: Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger, 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening

Firelands South Campus

1912 Hayes Ave. Sandusky, OH

Saturday, February 20

7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

 

Diabetes News – January 2021

NATIONAL BLOOD DONOR MONTH

January is the beginning of a new year and the perfect time to start the year celebrating National Blood Donor Month.

Due to increased seasonal illnesses during the winter months and inclement weather conditions, donations of blood and platelets decline and demand increases. The American Red Ross and Blood Banks of America encourage everyone can donate to continue their donations. Those who have never donated, to make an appointment. Blood donation is safer than ever before and saves lives. Millions of people including cancer patients, organ recipients, and victims of accidents; rely on blood donations from people like you and I.

Don’t stop giving just because the holidays are over. You can find your local donations sites and date/time here.

 


The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthier tweak

Start this recipe before you head out to make that blood donation and that evening you can snuggle in with a nice warm bowl of pure yumminess and the self satisfaction of knowing you helped to save a life.

Mediterranean Lentil Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp canola oil
  • 1 onion(s) (diced)
  • 2 clove garlic (minced)
  • 1 lb Italian turkey sausage((meat squeezed out of casing), sliced)
  • 32 oz low sodium chicken broth (reduced-sodium, fat-free)
  • 14-ounce, diced tomatoes
  • 3 cup water
  • 1 cup dried lentils
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • ¼ tsp dried oregano
  • 1 bay leaves

Directions:

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for 3 minutes or until clear. Add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds.
  2. Add the turkey Italian sausage and cook about 8 minutes until brown. Add the remaining ingredients.
  3. Bring the soup to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

Community offerings*

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19. Please call the number listed for the event to verify its availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634), or go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) – Erie County Senior Center

COST: Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger, 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840. New 2021 schedule pending.

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 70% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – December 2020

December is National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month

Almost everybody loves holiday parties, but drinking and driving can make that festive time deadly for drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. December’s National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month has a high fatality rate due to people driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both. According to the National Safety Council, over 40,000 people died in alcohol-related traffic accidents last year, so this year, stay safe during the holidays. If you are a diabetic, there are some additional things you should know about alcohol use.

 

Diabetes, Alcohol, and Social Drinking

People with diabetes should be particularly cautious when it comes to drinking alcohol because alcohol can make some of the complications of diabetes worse. First of all, alcohol impacts the liver in doing its job of regulating blood sugar. Alcohol can also interact with some medications that are prescribed to people with diabetes. Even if you only rarely drink alcohol, talk with your healthcare provider about it so that he or she knows which medications are best for you.

 

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Alcohol interacts with diabetes medications

Alcohol can cause blood glucose levels to rise or fall, depending on how much you drink. Some diabetes pills (including sulfonylureas and meglitinides) also lower blood glucose levels by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin. Combining the blood-sugar-lowering effects of the medication with alcohol can lead to hypoglycemia or “insulin shock,” which is a medical emergency.

  1. Alcohol prevents your liver from doing its job

The main function of your liver is to store glycogen, which is the stored form of glucose, so that you will have a source of glucose when you haven’t eaten. When you drink alcohol, your liver has to work to remove it from your blood instead of working to regulate blood sugar, or blood glucose. For this reason, you should never drink alcohol when your blood glucose is already low.

  1. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach

Food slows down the rate at which alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream. Be sure to eat a meal or snack containing carbohydrates if you are going to drink alcohol.

  1. Always test blood sugar before having an alcoholic beverage

Alcohol impairs your liver’s ability to produce glucose, so be sure to know your blood glucose number before you drink an alcoholic beverage.

  1. Alcohol can cause hypoglycemia

Within a few minutes of drinking alcohol, and for up to 12 hours afterward, alcohol can cause your blood glucose level to drop. After consuming alcohol, always check your blood glucose level to make sure it is in the safe zone. If your blood glucose is low, eat a snack to bring it up.

  1. You can save your life by drinking slowly

Drinking too much alcohol can make you feel dizzy, sleepy, and disoriented—the same symptoms as hypoglycemia. Be sure to wear a bracelet that alerts people around you to the fact that you have diabetes, so that if you start to behave like you are intoxicated they know that your symptoms could be caused by hypoglycemia. If you are hypoglycemic, you need food and/or glucose tablets to raise your blood glucose level.

  1. You can save your life by knowing your limit

Your healthcare provider will tell you how much alcohol is safe for you to drink. Depending on your health condition, that may mean no alcohol at all. In some cases, women with diabetes may have no more than one alcoholic beverage a day. Men should have no more than two.


The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthier tweak

Being a diabetic doesn’t mean you need to let Santa down. Make this delicious cookie for a great Christmas Eve treat. It may become your new holiday favorite!

ORANGE COOKIES

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1teaspoon stevia, OR 1 cup Splenda Original Granulated Sweetener
  • 4 teaspoons grated orange peel
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven at 350 degrees F or 180 degrees C for 15 minutes.
  2. Cream together the butter and sugar in a large bowl. Add in the orange peel and vanilla extract; beat well.
  3. In another bowl sift together the flour, baking soda and salt.
  4. Mix in the flour mix into the creamed butter mixture and stir it until well combined. Sometimes the cookie dough might have a sticky consistency. In such cases chill the dough in the refrigerator for an hour or so before baking otherwise you will have thin crepe-like cookies.
  5. Scoop out tablespoonful of dough for each cookie, slightly flatten it and place it on the baking sheet 2 inches apart. Bake 10-12 minutes or until the edges are browned lightly.
  6. Remove it from the oven and let the cooks remain in the pan for another 2-3 minutes and then transfer the orange cookies from the pan to a wire rack to cool completely before storing it in a air tight container.

 

Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) –Erie County Senior Center

COST:  Free

CONTACT:   Tina Elmlinger: 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.


 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

New 2021 schedule pending.

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 71% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – November 2020

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Consider that while almost 30 million people in the U.S. have some form of diabetes, one in four don’t even realize they’re walking around with the disease. National Diabetes Month is an annual event each November to boost awareness about the risk factors, symptoms, and types of diabetes. If you’ve been recently diagnosed with either Type 1 or Type 2, or if you are considered pre-diabetic, hear the stories, check out the latest research, and connect with others who can help you on your journey to live a healthier life.

There are two main conditions

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body can’t produce insulin, a hormone in the pancreas that breaks down carbohydrates into blood sugar or glucose, for energy. Insulin therapy helps the pancreas to function normally. Many children suffer from Type 1 diabetes although it can affect people of any age or background. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease where the body is unable to process our internal insulin well enough to keep blood sugar at normal levels.

Know your risk factors

You may be predisposed to Type 2 diabetes if you are overweight, older than 45, your parent had Type 2 diabetes, you barely exercise each week, and you have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Losing weight is a key preventive measure. With a 10-14 pound weight loss, you can improve your chances of avoiding or even beating diabetes. Try to exercise about 30 minutes a day, five times per week.

How to Observe National Diabetes Month

1.     Commit to a healthier lifestyle

Discover ways that you can live a little healthier by reviewing your habits. Are you getting enough sleep? Fatigue can cause a resistance to the insulin your body needs — and daytime tiredness can stop you from getting some life-saving exercise. Drink more water because dehydration keeps your body from functioning well. Be adventurous and add some new veggies and fruits to your diet to help keep those hunger pangs at bay.

2.     Assemble a “sick day” kit

It pays to be ready for those days when your diabetes or some other illness gets you down. With a “sick day” kit, you’ll be prepared in case you need to stay home and recuperate or head out to see your doctor. Some of the items in your kit may include blood glucose monitoring supplies, ketone test strips, glucose tablets or gel, a thermometer, hand sanitizer, an alarm clock or timer to stay on top of your glucose levels, and soft tissues. It’s your list so tailor it for your needs.

3.     Create a small cookbook

There are restrictions on what people with diabetes can eat. But that shouldn’t stop you from enjoying tasty treats. Scour special cookbooks and websites designed for diabetics and experiment with recipes. Choose from delicious ice cream cakes using light sugar, reduced-fat whipped toppings, sugar-free hot fudge sauce, or low-cal casserole because you don’t have to suffer with less flavor because of diabetes.

And speaking of cookbook and recipes…

Thanksgiving is a wonderful time of year for family to spend time together—and enjoy an indulgent meal. But for the 30 million Americans who live with type 2 diabetes, a spread of carb-heavy foods and sugary desserts can make managing blood sugar spikes difficult.

Of course, it can be even harder than usual to stick to a diabetes-friendly diet when all of your friends and family are chowing down on your mom’s homemade stuffing and pumpkin pie. However, it’s important to remember that you can enjoy the feast, too—it’s all about moderation.

So how do you let yourself indulge without going overboard? Keep these tips in mind before your feast:

Pile on the protein. Foods that are low-carb and high-protein will be the best options. Your body digests protein more slowly, thus creating less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Go for the turkey first!

Choose the right carbs. Carbs that come from high-quality, plant-based sources such as quinoa, sweet potatoes, winter squash, and berries come with fiber, which helps food digest slower. Limit the added sugar.

Keep your portion sizes in check. After all, there will be leftovers. Quantity and portion sizing will be the most important factor in keeping your blood-sugar levels balanced through the holidays.

Make smart swaps. You can make tiny changes to almost any recipe to make it more diabetes-friendly. For example, when making baked goods or desserts, substitute a healthier type of flour. Coconut and almond flours can be especially helpful in lowering the carbs, but whole wheat, oat, and chickpea flours will also add higher-quality carbs compared to white flour, creating a more diabetes-friendly dish.

Get moving. If you do overeat (hey, we are all human!), try going for a walk after the big meal, which will help prevent a blood sugar spike.

So there you have it—there’s no need to fret over the holiday spread. Now, let me help you with that left-over turkey.

The Diet-Betus – our version of recipe of the month just with a healthy tweak


Kale Soup with Turkey and Beans

Ingredients

  • 4 tsp Canola oil
  • 1 large Onion-diced
  • 1 c green pepper – diced
  • 2 clove garlic –minced
  • 10-12 oz turkey –cubed or shredded
  • 62 oz low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 c tomato – crushed (canned is fine)
  • 1 tsp basil
  • 1 tsp rosemary
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 cans (15 oz each) black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained
  • 6 cups Kale-chopped
  • 6 tbsp parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and green peppers, and sauté for 3 minutes or until clear. Add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients except for the Parmesan cheese.
  3. Bring the soup to a boil; then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Remove the soup from the heat and stir in the Parmesan cheese.

Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

 

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) Erie County Senior Center

COST:  Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger: 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

 

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

 

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Braniecki and Widmer

3960 East Harbor Road, Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, November 7

7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

 

Huron Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Williamson and Rousseau

300 Williams St, Huron, OH

Saturday, December 5

7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 71% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – October 2020

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast cancer doesn’t discriminate. ​Although breast cancer is more prevalent among American white women, African-American women tend to die from the disease more often. Overall, only one percent of American males are diagnosed with breast cancer, but African-American men just like women in their community, are more prone to die from the disease. An estimated 2,670 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the United States and approximately 500 will die. 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, except for skin cancers.

A risk factor is anything that increases your chances of getting a disease, such as breast cancer. But having a risk factor, or even many, does not mean that you are sure to get the disease. Certain breast cancer risk factors are related to personal behaviors, such as diet and exercise. Other lifestyle-related risk factors include decisions about having children and taking medicines that contain hormones.

Lifestyle-related Breast Cancer Risk Factors include:

  • Drinking Alcohol – The American Cancer Society recommends that women who drink have no more than 1 drink a day.
  • Being Overweight or Obese – being overweight after menopause is more strongly linked with an increased risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, whereas some research suggests that being overweight before menopause might increase your risk of the less common triple-negative breast cancer.
  • Not being physically active – The American Cancer Society recommends that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week (or a combination of these), preferably spread throughout the week.

For women:

  • Not having children – Women who have not had children or who had their first child after age 30 have a slightly higher breast cancer risk overall.
  • Not breastfeeding -breastfeeding may slightly lower breast cancer risk, especially if it’s continued for a year or more
  • Birth Control – Some birth control methods use hormones, which might increase breast cancer risk.
  • Hormone therapy after menopause – Use of combined hormone therapy after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer
  • Breast Implants -implants have not been linked with an increased risk of the most common types of breast cancer. However, they have been linked to a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma called breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL)

Many of these risk factors overlap with diabetic risk factors/preventions. Higher insulin levels have been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer. Managing your diabetes by keeping a healthy insulin level and lifestyle, you may also lessen your risk factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer is sometimes found after symptoms appear, but many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. This is why regular breast cancer screening is so important. Talk to you PCP about risk factors, screenings and other things you can do for disease prevention and/or treatment.

If you don’t have insurance or your insurance doesn’t cover mammograms, the resources below may help you find a low-cost or free mammogram (or help with the cost).

  • The Komen Breast Care Helpline can help you find low-cost breast cancer screening in your area. Call the helpline at 1-877 GO KOMEN (1-877-465-6636) Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. ET.
  • Some Komen Affiliates fund breast cancer education and screening projects in their communities. Find a local Affiliate and learn about programs in your area.
  • The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provides access to breast cancer screening to low-income, uninsured and underinsured women ages 40-64. It also provides access to diagnostic testing if results are abnormal, and referrals to treatment if breast cancer is diagnosed.

Call today to discuss getting your mammogram scheduled.


The Diet-Betus 

Pumpkin pie flavors, decorations, lattes and candles Pumpkins here, pumpkins there, pumpkins everywhere! So why not try some pumpkin soup! It a great way to warm up after a chilly afternoon of apple picking, leaf blowing and Halloween decorating.

Savory Pumpkin Soup Ingredients:

  • ½ Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 sweet onion, diced
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons curry powder
  • 1 head cauliflower, florets diced (about 5 cups of florets total)
  • 4 cups vegetable broth or chicken broth
  • 1 (15 ounce) can unsweetened pumpkin puree (about 1.75 cups total)
  • 1 tsp. salt, to taste
  • 1/2 cup full-fat canned coconut milk (or substitute with heavy cream)
  • Optional garnish: sliced green onions, chives, pumpkin seeds or sour cream
  • Like to spice things up a little, try adding a dash or two of cayenne pepper or a squirt of

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until soft and translucent (about 5-10 minutes). Add garlic, cumin and curry and cook for about 1 more minute, stirring.
  2. Add cauliflower, broth, and pumpkin. Turn heat to high, bring to a boil; cover. Reduce heat to low and simmer (covered) for about 20-30 minutes or until cauliflower is tender.
  3. Stir in milk and salt.
  4. Remove from heat and use an immersion blender to puree the soup until smooth. If you don’t have an immersion blender, just transfer the soup to a large blender and puree until smooth. Be careful with the hot soup!

Community offerings:

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.

Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) Erie County Senior Center

COST:  Free

CONTACT:  Tina Elmlinger, 419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month September-November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Kuns
101 So. Washington Street, Castalia, OH

Saturday, October 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

 

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Braniecki and Dr. Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road, Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, November 7
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

 

Huron Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Williamson and Dr. Rousseau
300 Williams St, Huron, OH

Saturday, November 5
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

 

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 71% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – September 2020

September is National Cholesterol Education Month

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance found in your body and many foods. Your body needs cholesterol to function normally and makes all that you need. Too much cholesterol can build up in your arteries. After a while, these deposits narrow your arteries, putting you at risk for heart disease and stroke.

Diabetes tends to lower “good” cholesterol levels and raise triglyceride and “bad” cholesterol levels, which increases the risk for heart disease and stroke. This common condition is called diabetic dyslipidemia. Diabetic dyslipidemia means your lipid profile is going in the wrong direction. It’s a deadly combination that puts patients at risk for premature coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. Studies show a link between insulin resistance, which is a precursor to type 2 diabetes, and diabetic dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and blood vessel disease. These conditions can develop even before diabetes is diagnosed.

High cholesterol usually doesn’t have any symptoms. As a result, many people do not know that their cholesterol levels are too high. However, doctors can do a simple blood test to check your cholesterol. High cholesterol can be controlled through lifestyle changes or if it is not enough, through medications.

Lifestyle changes that can help lower cholesterol are:

  • Low-fat and high-fiber food (Eat more fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, and whole grains).
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don’t smoke or quit if you smoke.
  • For adults, getting at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate or 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous physical activity a week. For those aged 6-17, getting 1 hour or more of physical activity each day.

Speaking of physical activity, how about walking a mile to help bring awareness to older adult falls. Falls Prevention Awareness Week, September 21-25, 2020. The Stand Steady Coalition and the Erie County Health Department initiative asks all of Erie County to help take “10 Million Steps to Prevent Falls” throughout the month of September.

As part of the Stand Steady Coalition, we invite you to participate in a VIRTUAL fall prevention walk during September, 21st through September, 25th, 2020. Your virtual pledge to walk 1 mile will bring awareness to the prevention of falls among older adults.

Falling is NOT a normal part of aging. Increased physical activity, like walking several times a week, is one strategy to lower the risk. “10 Million Steps to Prevent Falls” partners organize community walking groups and events on or around the first day of FALL to spread the word that simple changes can make a big difference. This year we decided to only offer the pledge to walk 1 mile and maintain the safety of our community.

You can make your pledge to walk here: https://mailchi.mp/f8d9c3779cfa/national-fall-prevention-awareness-pledge

Football, falling leaves and spice treats everywhere. Treat yourself to a comforting reward (after that walk!) that is not only tasty, but takes less than 5 minutes to enjoy!


Cinnamon Roll Smoothie

Ingredients

  • 1cup vanilla almond milk
  • 1/2cup vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1/4cup old fashioned oats
  • 1Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/4teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1frozen banana (or fresh banana, but add in 3-4 ice cubes with fresh banana)

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. ENJOY!

Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) –Erie County Senior Center

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening

Firelands Main Campus
1111 Hayes Ave
Sandusky, OH

Saturday, September 12
7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Kuns
101 So. Washington Street
Castalia, OH

Saturday, October 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, November 7
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 71% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – August 2020

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

Immunizations are an important part of yearly checkups and not just for kids. Each year thousands of adults in the United States get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines — some people are hospitalized, and some even die. People with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) are at higher risk for serious problems from certain vaccine-preventable diseases. Getting vaccinated is an important step in staying healthy. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations up-to-date.

Why Vaccines are Important for You

Diabetes, even if well managed, can make it harder for your immune system to fight infections, so you may be at risk for more serious complications from an illness compared to people without diabetes.

    • Some illnesses, like influenza, can raise your blood glucose to dangerously high levels.
    • People with diabetes have higher rates of hepatitis B than the rest of the population. Outbreaks of hepatitis B associated with blood glucose monitoring procedures have happened among people with diabetes.
    • People with diabetes are at increased risk for death from pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (blood infection) and meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord).
  • Immunization provides the best protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.
  • Vaccines are one of the safest ways for you to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare.

Frequently recommended adult vaccines may include: Influenza, Pneumococcal, Hep B, Zoster and Tdap.

Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/rec-vac/health-conditions/diabetes.html


With the summer growing season in full swing and fresh veggies abundant. Here is a diabetic friendly treat that help you with all that extra zucchini.

5-Ingredient Zucchini Fritters
INGREDIENTS
  • 4 cups shredded zucchini
  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/3 cup sliced scallions (green and white parts)
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Sour cream, for serving (optional)
INSTRUCTIONS

Place the shredded zucchini in a colander set over a bowl and sprinkle the zucchini lightly with salt. Allow the zucchini to stand for 10 minutes. Using your hands, squeeze out as much liquid from the zucchini as possible. Transfer the zucchini to a large bowl.

Add the flour, eggs, sliced scallions, 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper to the bowl, stirring until the mixture is combined. Line a plate with paper towels.

Add the olive oil to large sauté pan set over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, scoop 3-tablespoon mounds of the zucchini mixture into the pan, pressing them lightly into rounds and spacing them at least 2 inches apart. Cook the zucchini fritters for 2 to 3 minutes, then flip them once and cook an additional 2 minutes until golden brown and cooked throughout. Transfer the zucchini fritters to the paper towel-lined plate and immediately sprinkle them with salt. Repeat the scooping and cooking process with the remaining zucchini mixture.

Serve the zucchini fritters topped with sour cream (optional) and sliced scallions.


Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) –Erie County Senior Center

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

 HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, August 15
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening

Firelands Main Campus
1111 Hayes Ave
Sandusky, OH

Saturday, September 12
7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Kuns
101 So. Washington Street
Castalia, OH

Saturday, October 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, but so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 71% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – July 2020

July is National Grilling/Picnic Month

Picnics hearken back to mid-18th-century al fresco French dining.

July is an excellent time for National Picnic Month and summer is the best time of the year for outdoor cooking. The fresh air stirs the appetite, and garden vegetables and fruits make outdoor eating easier.

Remember to keep the meals simple and focus on the company. Sandwiches, finger foods, and beverages may seem plain, but it’s more about spending time with each other and being in nature.

Grilled foods can be healthy if you pay attention to the foods you grill and the way they are grilled. Healthy food options and activity are important parts of managing your diabetes. Making your picnic “diabetic friendly” is not as hard as you might think. Use these tips to make it easy.

  • Choose wholegrain varieties of starchy carbs such as couscous or pasta in salads, potato salads with the skins left on, and wholegrain bread for sandwiches.
  • For cold meats, try leaner options such as chicken or turkey breast rather than salami or ham.
  • Add crunch to sandwiches with extra veggies such as pepper, carrot, cucumber and lettuce.
  • Use beans in a salad to up the protein content and to make it more filling.
  • Swap sugary and fatty treats such as cake and cookies for healthier alternatives – mixed nuts, fruit, unsalted rice cakes and low-fat fruit yoghurts make great replacements.
  • Sip on water, no-added sugar fruit drinks or diet drinks to stay hydrated.
  • Make your own dips, dressings and marinades from scratch at home to avoid the high fat, sugar and salt content from store-bought varieties.
  • From playing games to going for a walk, combine your picnic with some physical activity to maximize the health benefits.

So who’s ready to grill!  And whose ready to try something a little different on the grill. July is not just for picnics and grilling. It’s also a month to celebrate fresh, ripe peaches. Try combining the peaches with the grilling for a dish that will make your taste buds celebrate!

Ingredients:

  • 4 bone-in pork loin or end-loin chops, each about 9 oz. and 3/4 inch thick, trimmed of excess fat
  • Olive oil for brushing, plus 2 tsp.
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 peaches, quartered and pitted
  • 2 to 3 tsp. balsamic vinegar
  • Small fresh basil leaves for garnish

Directions:

Remove the pork chops from the refrigerator and let stand for 30 minutes.

Brush the chops very lightly with olive oil, and season generously on both sides with salt and pepper. In a bowl, combine the peaches and the 2 tsp. olive oil. Season with pepper and toss to coat evenly. Set aside.

Prepare a medium-hot fire in a grill, or preheat a cast-iron grill pan on the stovetop over medium-high heat.

Place the chops on the grill rack over the hottest part of the fire or in the grill pan and cook until golden, about 2 minutes. Move the chops to a cooler part of the grill or reduce the heat and cook until the pork is firm and cooked through but not dry, 3 to 4 minutes more per side. Place the peaches over direct heat and sear, turning with tongs, until the cut sides are golden, 30 to 60 seconds total.

Transfer the chops and peaches to a platter and drizzle sparingly with the vinegar. Garnish with basil leaves and serve immediately. Serves 4.

Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed, changed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) –Erie County Senior Center

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Norwalk Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Ruggles
348 Milan Ave
Norwalk, OH

Saturday, July 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, August 15
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening

Firelands Main Campus
1111 Hayes Ave
Sandusky, OH

Saturday, September 12
7:10 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, but so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 71% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – June 2020

June is National Men’s Health Month

Out of the 15 leading causes of death, men lead women in all of them except Alzheimer’s disease, which many men don’t live long enough to develop. On average, men die five years earlier than women.

The Men’s Health Network (MHN) reports that men die at higher rates than women from these 10 causes of death – heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, accidents, pneumonia and influenza, diabetes, suicide, kidney disease, and chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Many of the top 10 causes of death are preventable, and can be treated, if found early. You can start by following these steps.

  • Visit your primary care provider every year
  • Get your cholesterol checked, beginning at age 25 and every five years.
  • Control your blood pressure and cholesterol
  • If you smoke, stop.
  • Increase your physical activity level to 30 minutes per day, most days of the week.
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables and less saturated or trans fats.

Father’s day is the perfect day to try this recipe.

Montreal-Style Steak & Sweet Potato Frites

2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon ground pepper
¼ cup nonfat plain yogurt
1 tablespoon finely crumbled blue cheese
1 tablespoon minced fresh chives, plus more for garnish
1-1 1/4 pounds flat-iron steak or shoulder petite cut steak, trimmed
2 teaspoons 25% Less Sodium Montreal steak seasoning

Directions

Step 1:

Position racks in upper and lower thirds of oven; preheat to 450 degrees F. Coat 2 large rimmed baking sheets with cooking spray.

Step 2:

Slice sweet potatoes crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Cut each slice into 1/4-inch-wide fries. Toss with 2 tablespoons oil in a large bowl; add paprika, cumin, salt and pepper and toss again. Divide the fries between the prepared baking sheets, spreading evenly. Bake on the upper and lower racks, stirring the fries and switching the pans halfway, until browned and tender, 25 to 28 minutes.

Step 3:

Meanwhile, combine yogurt, blue cheese and chives in a small bowl.

Step 4:

When the fries are halfway done, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Sprinkle steak with Montreal steak seasoning and cook, turning once, until browned on both sides, 2 to 4 minutes per side for medium. Let rest on a clean cutting board for 5 minutes. Slice crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick pieces and serve with the sweet potato fries and sauce, garnished with more chives, if desired.

This recipe also grills well!

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 3 Oz. Steak, 1 Cup Fries & 1 Tbsp. Sauce Each

Per Serving:

396 calories; 18.3 g total fat; 4.8 g saturated fat; 67 mg cholesterol; 673 mg sodium. 991 mg potassium; 30.4 g carbohydrates; 4.9 g fiber; 10 g sugar; 26.8 g protein; 26852 IU vitamin a iu; 13 mg niacin equivalents; 1 mg vitamin b6; 28 mg vitamin c; 19 mcg folate; 112 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 61 mg magnesium;

Exchanges: 

2 Starch, 3 Lean Meat, 2 Fat

Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times.

If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634)

Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Huron Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Williamson and Rousseau
300 Williams St.
Huron, OH

Saturday, June 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Norwalk Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Ruggles
348 Milan Ave
Norwalk, OH

Saturday, July 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, August 15
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, but so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.

Diabetes News – May 2020

May is Stroke Awareness Month

A stroke happens when the blood supply to part of your brain is suddenly interrupted. Then brain tissue is damaged. Most strokes happen because a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain or neck. A stroke can cause movement problems, pain, numbness and problems with thinking, remembering or speaking. Some people also have emotional problems, such as depression, after a stroke.

If you have diabetes, your chances of having a stroke are 1.5 times higher than in people who don’t have diabetes. But your risk is even greater if:

  • you’re over age 55
  • your family background is African American
  • you’ve already had a stroke or a transient ischemic (ih-SKEE-mik) attack (also called a TIA or a mini-stroke)
  • you have a family history of stroke or TIAs
  • you have heart disease
  • you have high blood pressure
  • you’re overweight
  • you have high LDL (bad) cholesterol and low HDL (good) cholesterol levels
  • you are not physically active
  • you smoke

You can’t change some of these risk factors. But you can lower your chances of having a stroke by taking care of your diabetes and tackling some of the other risk factors, such as losing weight if you’re overweight.

Typical warning signs of a stroke develop suddenly and can include:

  • weakness or numbness on one side of the body
  • sudden confusion or trouble understanding
  • trouble talking
  • dizziness, loss of balance, or trouble walking
  • trouble seeing out of one or both eyes
  • double vision
  • severe headache

If you have warning signs of a stroke, call 9-1-1 right away. Getting treatment as soon as possible after a stroke can help prevent permanent damage to your brain.

For more information on Strokes: https://www.stroke.org/

May is also National Mediterranean Diet Month (which happens to be a heart healthy diet with tons of flavor). A Mediterranean-style diet typically includes:

  • plenty of fruits, vegetables, bread and other grains, potatoes, beans, nuts and seeds;
  • olive oil as a primary fat source; and
  • dairy products, eggs, fish and poultry in low to moderate amounts.

Fish and poultry are more common than red meat in this diet. It also centers on minimally processed, plant-based foods. Fruit is a common dessert instead of sweets.

Greek Chicken Gyro Salad

Servings 2 salads

Ingredients

  • 6cups chopped romaine lettuce
  • 1 8-ounce Chicken Breast sliced or chopped
  • 1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans drained
  • 1cup cherry tomatoes sliced
  • 1cup sliced cucumber
  • 1/2avocado chopped
  • 1/4cup sliced kalamata olives
  • 1/4cup sliced red onion
  • 2pita bread pockets
  • Canola oil spray
  • Paprika
  • 1/4cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4cup red wine vinegar
  • 1clove garlic peeled and minced
  • 2teaspoons oregano
  • 1teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2teaspoon each of kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Store bought or Homemade Tzatziki sauce for drizzling

Instructions

  1. Add the lettuce to a large serving bowl and top with the sliced chicken, garbanzo beans, tomatoes, cucumber, avocado, olives and red onion.
  2. Cut the pita breads into triangles and spray with canola oil. Sprinkle with paprika and toast until golden. Sprinkle with kosher salt.
  3. To make the dressing add the olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, oregano, sugar and salt and pepper to a small canning jar. Top with the lid and shake well until blended and emulsified. Season with more sugar and salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and toss to taste. Drizzle with the tzatziki as desired.

Homemade Tzatziki sauce

Ingredients

  • ½cucumber , halved with skin and seeds removed
  • 3/4cupGreek Plain Nonfat Yogurt
  • 2cloves garlic , pressed or minced
  • 1tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1tablespoon fresh dill , minced
  • Pinchof kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Prepare the tzatziki sauce by grating the cucumber. Gather the cucumber together and place in a paper towel and press the water out of the shredded cucumber and place in a medium size bowl.
  2. Add the yogurt, garlic, red wine vinegar, fresh dill, kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper and mix well.
  3. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes or up to 3 days.

Community offerings: *

* Many community offering have been postponed or canceled as a result of the coronavirus/COVID 19.  Please call the number listed for the event to verify availability, dates and times. If you have questions regarding Coronavirus/COVID-19 please call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634) Or, go to https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html or https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/.


Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

COST:
Free

CONTACT:
Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program [DEEP] is offered every Wednesday for six weeks. Good attendance is important. This free program is for diabetics, pre-diabetics, and spouses or caregivers of a diabetic.  Residents of Erie County, aged 60 or older, please call 419-624-1856 to register.

Diabetes Support Group – Firelands Regional Medical Center

The Diabetes Support Group presented by Jean Feick CNP,CDE, meets the third Wednesday of each month Sept–November and January-May from 12:00pm –1:00pm.  This meeting is free to the public and no registration is required. Attendees are welcome to purchase lunch in the hospital cafeteria and come to the adjacent Cafeteria Meeting #1.  A different topic will be reviewed each month. If you have questions, please contact the Diabetes Education Department at 419-557-6992.

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Kuns
101 South Washington St.
Castalia, OH

Saturday, May 9
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Huron Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Williamson and Rousseau
300 Williams St.
Huron, OH

Saturday, June 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Norwalk Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Ruggles
348 Milan Ave,
Norwalk, OH

Saturday, July 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road,
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, August 15
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management, but so is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you.