Diabetes News – August 2019

August is National Eye Exam Month

Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable new onset blindness in working-age adults. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease for people with diabetes. It occurs when the small blood vessels in the eye are damaged by high levels of glucose in the blood. Anyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can have diabetic eye disease and not know it, as it is painless and often has no symptoms until very advanced stages. The earlier it is diagnosed the more effective the treatment. With appropriate care you can reduce the risk of blindness and increase your chances of preserving sight.

Clinical guidelines recommend you take a three-pronged approach to preserving your vision:

  1. Maintain excellent A1C and blood glucose levels.
  2. Keep your blood pressure and other health factors, such as your cholesterol, in check.
  3. Make sure you get your eyes checked YEARLY through a dilated eye exam (an exam in which the doctor places drops in your eyes) or specially validated photographs of your retinas (the inside of the eyes).

Although diabetes is the leading cause of adult-onset blindness, the good news is that vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy can be prevented. Take charge of your eye health and make sure that an annual dilated eye exam is part of your comprehensive treatment plan.

August is also great grilling weather! This recipe is definitely worth trying. Use the vegetables recommended in the recipe or switch it up with something fresh from the garden or the farmer’s market.

Summer Steak Kabobs

Ingredients

  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1-1/2 pounds beef top sirloin steak, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 pound whole fresh mushrooms
  • 2 medium onions, cut into wedges
  • 1 medium sweet red pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium green pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium yellow summer squash, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • Hot cooked rice – your favorite kind will work just fine

Directions

  • In a large bowl, combine first six ingredients. Add beef; turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight.
  • On 12 metal or soaked wooden skewers, alternately thread beef and vegetables; discard marinade. Grill kabobs, covered, over medium heat until beef reaches desired doneness, 10-12 minutes, turning occasionally. Serve with rice. ENJOY!

COMMUNITY OFFERINGS:

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Port Clinton Health & Wellness Screening

Drs. Braniecki and Dr. Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH
Saturday, August 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Sandusky Health & Wellness Screening

Firelands Main Campus
1111 Hayes Ave. Sandusky, OH
Saturday, September 14
7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

No classes available at this time. Classes will start again next year. Dates will be posted here later this fall.

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger

419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

For additional date and locations contact Serving Our Seniors at 419-624-1856.

Diabetes News – July 2019

July is National Picnic Month

Picnics hearken back to mid-18th-century al fresco French dining. July is an excellent time for National Picnic Month. The fresh air stirs the appetite, and garden vegetables and fruits make outdoor eating easier. Remember to keep the meals simple and focus on the company. Sandwiches, finger foods, and beverages may seem plain, but it’s more about spending time with each other and being in nature.

Healthy food options and activity are important parts of managing your diabetes. Making your picnic “diabetic friendly” is not as hard as you might think. Use these tips to make it easy.
• Choose wholegrain varieties of starchy carbs such as couscous or pasta in salads, potato salads with the skins left on, and wholegrain bread for sandwiches.
• For cold meats, try leaner options such as chicken or turkey breast rather than salami or ham.
• Add crunch to sandwiches with extra veggies such as pepper, carrot, cucumber and lettuce.
• Use beans in a salad to up the protein content and to make it more filling.
• Swap sugary and fatty treats such as cake and cookies for healthier alternatives – mixed nuts, fruit, unsalted rice cakes and low-fat fruit yogurts make great replacements.
• Sip on water, no-added sugar fruit drinks or diet drinks to stay hydrated.
• Make your own dips, dressings and marinades from scratch at home to avoid the high fat, sugar and salt content from store-bought varieties.
• From playing games to going for a walk, combine your picnic with some physical activity to maximize the health benefits.

Try adding this tasty recipe to your picnic basket.

Pulled Chicken & Pickled Veggie Wraps

Ingredients

2 cups julienned or coarsely shredded carrots
1 cup julienned radishes
1 cup thinly sliced red onion
½ cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup light mayonnaise
1 teaspoon siracha, plus more for serving
8 7- to 8-inch low-carb whole-wheat tortillas, such as La Tortilla Factory
8 Bibb and/or red-leaf lettuce leaves
2⅔ cups shredded cooked chicken breast

Directions

• Combine carrots, radishes, onion, vinegar, sugar and salt in a sealable plastic bag. Turn to coat. Set the bag in a shallow dish and marinate in the refrigerator for 1 hour.
• Stir mayonnaise and siracha in a small bowl. Drain the pickled vegetables (discard marinade).
• Spread 1 Tbsp. of the mayonnaise mixture on each tortilla. Top with lettuce, chicken and pickled vegetables and roll up. Wrap and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Serve drizzled with more siracha, if desired.

COMMUNITY OFFERINGS:

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center
You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Vermilion Health & Wellness Screening
Dr. Rogers Office
1605 State Route 60
Vermilion, OH

Thursday, July 11
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Port Clinton Health &Wellness Screening
Drs. Braniecki and Widmer
3960 East Harbor Road
Port Clinton, OH

Saturday, August 17
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

• Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
• Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
• PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
• Vitamin D – $35;
• TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

WHEN:
July 10, 2019 – August 14, 2019
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

WHERE:
Kelleys Island School
528 Division Street, Kelleys Island

COST:
Free

CONTACT:
Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger
419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required, 419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

For additional date and locations contact Serving Our Seniors at 419-624-1856.

Diabetes News – June 2019

June is National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month

Read more

Diabetes News – May 2019

Diabetes News – April 2019

April is National Gardening Month

What Are Some of the Health Benefits of Gardening With Diabetes?

Exercise is one of the main benefits.

Did you know to clear land for 30 minutes burns around 200 calories while weeding for 30 minutes burns about 182 calories, and planting bulbs or seeds for half an hour burns about 162 calories?

Bending, walking and stretching all help keep your heart and body healthy. Use rainwater collected in a barrel to water plants with an old-style watering can rather than using a hosepipe or sprinkler system. This method adds to the number of steps you do each day, tones up arms and avoids water wastage too.

Growing your own produce means you are much more likely to want to eat it. Nothing beats the flavor of something you have made from scratch with your own ingredients. Think of all the yummy dishes you can create, like this one:

Tomato Cucumber Salad        

Ingredients

  • 2 cups tomatoes, cut into bite sized pieces

(cherry and Roma tomatoes work well)

  • 3 cups cucumbers, sliced into 1/4” coins
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 Tablespoons red onions, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh basil leaves, chopped

Instructions

  1. Add cherry tomatoes and cucumbers to a bowl. 
  2. Drizzle olive oil and vinegar on top. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Toss everything to coat. Garnish with diced red onion and fresh basil.
  4. Chill, covered in refrigerator until ready to serve.

COMMUNITY OFFERINGS:

HEALTH & WELLNESS SCREENING – offered by Firelands Regional Medical Center

You must Pre-register for all Lab Work at 419-557-7840.

Norwalk Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Ruggles’ Office 348 Milan Ave. Suite 2 Norwalk, OH

Saturday April 20, 2019

7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Castalia Health & Wellness Screening

Dr. Kuns’ Office 101 South Washington Castalia, OH

Saturday May 11

7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Health & Wellness Screenings include:

  • Complete Blood Count with Metabolic & Lipid Panel (No Eating or Drinking for 12 Hours – Water Allowed – includes liver and kidney function studies, fasting blood sugar, thyroid, cholesterol, HDL/LDL and triglyceride levels along with a complete blood count.) – $45;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (A three month report card on how well your blood sugars have been running. A test used to diagnose diabetes and/or to evaluate how well your treatment plan is working.) – $25;
  • PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)- $30;
  • Vitamin D – $35;
  • TSH – $25

Diet and exercise are an essential part of diabetes management. So is routine testing.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

Last quarter, 68% of our diabetic patients had an A1C of less than 9%. Talk with your provider to discuss the right options for you, including programs such as DEEP.

Diabetes Empowerment Education Program – DEEP

WHEN:

April 10, 2019– May 15, 2019            5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

WHERE:

Townsend School Computer Lab
207 Lowell Street, Castalia

COST:

Free

CONTACT:

Serving Our Seniors /Tina Elmlinger

419-624-1856

The presenter is Tina Elmlinger, Healthcare Advocate Trainer. Classes are held once a week for six weeks for Erie County residents who are aged 60 or older and are pre-diabetic or diabetic. A spouse or caregiver may also attend. Advanced registration is required419-624-1856. Please call and leave your name, phone number and the name of the program you wish to attend. If the class is cancelled, you will be notified.

Additional dates and locations:

WHEN:

April 22, 2019 – May 27, 2019           5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

WHERE:

Ritter Library

5680 Liberty Avenue, Vermilion

WHEN:

May 9, 2019 – June13, 2019              6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

WHERE:

Sandusky Library       

114 E Adams Street, Sandusky

WHEN:

July 10, 2019 – August 14, 2019        1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

WHERE:

Kelleys Island School

528 Division Street, Kelleys Island

Cost is free, but you must pre-register.

Diabetes News – March 2019

Diabetes News – February 2019

Health Center Week August 12-18th

Newly Renovated Facility

Secondhand Smoke: Risks and Avoidance

At Family Health Services, we’re proud to provide care for both mothers and new children within our obstetrics and gynecology fields. We want to do everything we can to help you birth and raise a healthy child.

One important area for all new parents is the avoidance of secondhand smoke in infants and all children. Here are some basics to know on secondhand smoke, including how to reduce the risk of exposure for you and your child.

Secondhand Smoke Basics

Also called environmental tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke is any smoke from a burning tobacco product, plus any smoke exhaled by a smoker. In a startling figure, it’s estimated that 60 percent of children between ages 3 and 11 are exposed to secondhand smoke.

Secondhand smoke is an issue due to the number of chemicals present in cigarette smoke – over 4,000 in total, with over 50 known cancer-causing agents among them. Smoke remains in rooms long after smokers have left, settling on surfaces. Not only can the chemicals cause cancer, they can lead to lung issues, ear infections, sleep disorders and more. Secondhand smoke also puts both mothers and children at risk of complications during pregnancy and birth.

Reducing Exposure Chances

If you’re a smoker, take all precautions necessary to avoid smoking or vaping in your home. If you must do so, only use rooms with windows and try to avoid areas where your children are often present. As an additional precaution, consider using a fan to help move smoke out of the room. Never smoke with your child in the car – many states actually make doing so completely illegal, and with good reason. Chemicals from the smoke can stay in the air in your car even after you’re done smoking, even hours later.

For more on the dangers of secondhand smoke, or to learn about any of our health services, speak to the caregivers at Family Health Services today.